Alice


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Alice

(ˈælɪs) or

the Alice

n
(Placename) slang Austral short for Alice Springs
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

Alice

[ˈælɪs]
A. NAlicia
Alice in WonderlandAlicia en el país de las maravillas
Alice through the Looking-GlassAlicia en el país del espejo
B. CPD Alice band N (Brit) → diadema f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Alice was beginning to get very tired of sitting by her sister on the bank, and of having nothing to do: once or twice she had peeped into the book her sister was reading, but it had no pictures or conversations in it, `and what is the use of a book,' thought Alice `without pictures or conversation?'
There was nothing so VERY remarkable in that; nor did Alice think it so VERY much out of the way to hear the Rabbit say to itself, `Oh dear!
In another moment down went Alice after it, never once considering how in the world she was to get out again.
Go tell your master I'm coming; and if you happen to see Mistress Alice, his daughter, give Matthew Maule's humble respects to her.
"He talk of Mistress Alice!" cried Scipio, as he returned from his errand.
It was the harpsichord which Alice Pyncheon had brought with her from beyond the sea.
But the black kitten had been finished with earlier in the afternoon, and so, while Alice was sitting curled up in a corner of the great arm-chair, half talking to herself and half asleep, the kitten had been having a grand game of romps with the ball of worsted Alice had been trying to wind up, and had been rolling it up and down till it had all come undone again; and there it was, spread over the hearth-rug, all knots and tangles, with the kitten running after its own tail in the middle.
'Oh, you wicked little thing!' cried Alice, catching up the kitten, and giving it a little kiss to make it understand that it was in disgrace.
ALICE HINDMAN, a woman of twenty-seven when George Willard was a mere boy, had lived in Wines- burg all her life.
Alice's step-father was a carriage painter, and given to drink.
Little Alice sat on Grandfather's footstool, with a picture- book in her hand; and, for every picture, the child was telling Grandfather a story.
Charley was too big a boy, of course, to care anything about little Alice's stories, although Grandfather appeared to listen with a good deal of interest.