Archimedes' principle


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Archimedes' principle

n
(General Physics) a law of physics stating that the apparent upward force (buoyancy) of a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the displaced fluid
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Archimedes' principle

The principle that a body submersed in a liquid loses weight equal to that of the volume of liquid that it displaces.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Archimedes' principle - (hydrostatics) the apparent loss in weight of a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the displaced fluidArchimedes' principle - (hydrostatics) the apparent loss in weight of a body immersed in a fluid is equal to the weight of the displaced fluid
law of nature, law - a generalization that describes recurring facts or events in nature; "the laws of thermodynamics"
hydrostatics - study of the mechanical properties of fluids that are not in motion
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Translations

Archimedes’ principle

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References in periodicals archive ?
The main aim of the present study is to propose and validate a simple and direct measurement method based on Archimedes' principle, which provides real value for maximum stomach volume in fish.
Archimedes discovered how to calculate the displacement of irregular shapes, which we know as the hydrostatic or Archimedes' principle (Toomer, 2017).
This paper describes an attempt to teach the principle of flotation to a class of sixth graders--who had not yet been taught these concepts--so they could understand (and, perhaps, arrive at) Archimedes' principle. Using a modified version of the Predict, Observe, Explain (POE) pedagogy called PROVE (Predict, Reason Out, Verify), this paper describes how students began to use a process of iterative reasoning to develop their conceptual understanding of the law of flotation of objects, and how some of them came very close to understanding the principle, without the introduction of the necessary concepts.
(2008) used an elliptic formula by 2D-USG and compared it with the postsurgical total TV measured by Archimedes' principle. They found that the mean USG volume was significantly lower than the mean postsurgical total thyroid volume and they developed mathematical formulas in order to reduce USG volume underestimation and to predict the real TV using a linear model.
Although with the less percentage, the apparent porosity calculated from Archimedes' principle was in agreement with the porosity determined by [mu]CT in which the slightly higher porosity was obtained as the lateral shift increased.
Making use of Archimedes' principle, the volume of coated clod is calculated from the clod's water displacement (Saleh 1993; Grossman and Reinsch 2002).
In his treatise On Floating Bodies Archimedes proves that solids submerged in water seem to lose the weight of the water that they displace (Archimedes' principle).
According to Archimedes' principle, the buoyancy force must be equal to the weight of the volume of the fluid of the object should displace.
I did a demonstration on 'Why Do Ships Float?' It was Archimedes' principle for kids.