artemisia

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Related to Artemisias: Artemisia vulgaris, Roman wormwood

ar·te·mis·i·a

 (är′tə-mĭzh′ē-ə, -mĭzh′ə, -mĭz′ē-ə)
n.
Any of various aromatic plants of the genus Artemisia in the composite family, having green or grayish foliage and usually numerous small discoid flower heads and including mugwort, sagebrush, tarragon, and wormwood.

[Middle English artemesie, mugwort, from Old French, from Latin artemisia, from Greek artemisiā, wormwood, after Artemis (to whom it was sacred).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

artemisia

(ˌɑːtɪˈmiːzɪə)
n
(Plants) any herbaceous perennial plant of the genus Artemisia, of the N hemisphere, such as mugwort, sagebrush, and wormwood: family Asteraceae (composites)
[C14: via Latin from Greek, probably from Artemis]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ar•te•mis•ia

(ˌɑr təˈmɪʒ ə, -ˈmɪʒ i ə-, -ˈmɪz i ə)

n., pl. -mis•ias.
any of several composite plants of the genus Artemisia, having aromatic foliage and small disk flowers, including the sagebrush and wormwood.
[1350–1400; Middle English: mugwort < Latin < Greek, <Ártemis Artemis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.artemisia - any of various composite shrubs or herbs of the genus Artemisia having aromatic green or greyish foliageartemisia - any of various composite shrubs or herbs of the genus Artemisia having aromatic green or greyish foliage
genus Artemisia - usually aromatic shrubs or herbs of north temperate regions and South Africa and western South America: wormwood; sagebrush; mugwort; tarragon
Artemisia dracunculus, estragon, tarragon - aromatic perennial of southeastern Russia
bush, shrub - a low woody perennial plant usually having several major stems
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
pelyněk
maruna
References in classic literature ?
Suidas is confusing the two Artemisias, but he may be right in attributing the poem to about 480 B.C.
Though popularly ascribed to Homer, its real author is said by Suidas to have been Pigres, a Carian, brother of Artemisia, `wife of Mausonis', who distinguished herself at the battle of Salamis.
The queen Artemisia buried her husband Mausolus in a tomb which was reckoned one of the seven wonders of the world; but none of these tombs, or of the many others of the heathens, were ornamented with winding-sheets or any of those other offerings and tokens that show that they who are buried there are saints."
He was old, and his woollen gaberdine still reeked of the stinking artemisia of the mountain passes.
USE Artemisias to add slashes of silver between dark green plants.
There are Mediterranean plants such as santolinas, lavenders, artemisias and salvia for starters.
Artemisia is a promising natural source of phytochemicals with potent antimalarial and anticancer properties [2-7].
One of the largest genera in the tribe Anthemideae of the Asteraceae (Compositae) is the genus Artemisia, which grows mostly in the temperate zone of Asia, Europe, and North America [8].
Artemisia annua L (sweet wormwood, qinhao) has traditionally been used in Chinese medicine.
Artemisia annua L (sweet wormwood, qinghao) has traditionally been used in China for the treatment of fever and chills.
Susan Sontag begins her introduction to a new English edition of the Italian novel, Artemisia, a piece of historical fiction about the Baroque painter Artemisia Gentileschi published in 1947 by Anna Banti, by citing its famous opening words "non piangere" ("don't cry"), returning repeatedly to the phrase (Sontag 1).
This highly productive treachery is the basis of Artemisia. In its invention of the past, the novel embraces a radical defamiliarization, casting into relief the impossibility of transparency, the epistemological uncertainty which characterizes any encounter with "history." Anna Banti depicts a world in which knowledge is in crisis.