British English

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British English

n.
The English language used in England as distinguished from that used elsewhere.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Brit′ish Eng′lish


n.
the English language as spoken and written in Great Britain.
[1865–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations
inglese britannico
References in classic literature ?
She spoke English without an accent, or rather with that distinctively British accent which, on his arrival in Europe, had struck Newman as an altogether foreign tongue, but which, in women, he had come to like extremely.
AMERICAN parents say their children are picking up British accents after watching Peppa Pig - which is voiced by a teenager from Rochdale.
As Americans we often associate British accents with intelligence and class, both desirable qualities for a mate."
The website pointed out that British accents come in wide array of influences-from West Country and Welsh to Scouse and Glaswegian-which may have been a factor in the language's popularity among the female population.
DOWNING Street has insisted a murderous Islamic State video featuring a masked extremist and a young boy with British accents shows the terrorist group is "under pressure".
After a series of lacklustre swordfights and a story that unfolds with the grace of an arthritic panda, Nicolas Cage turns up with one of the worst British accents ever heard.
After 40 minutes of lacklustre swordfights and a story that unfolds with the grace of an arthritic panda, Nicolas Cage turns up with one of the worst British accents ever heard.
Frenchman and former hostage Didier Francois yesterday claimed he recognised the American journalist's killer as the head of a gang given the nickname because of their British accents.
In a report by the (http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/aug/20/isis-militant-islamic-state-james-foley-guards-british) Guardian , the ISIS member who was identified as Foley's executioner has called himself "John." Former hostages who were interviewed have accustomed themselves to associate the names of the three militants to the Beatles because of their upbringing and undeniable British accents.
She writes that Simon Prebble, reading Sword of Honour, "gives a capable, stiff-upper-lipped performance" and conveys "British class tension." Christian Rodska, however, reading the three novels, shows himself "master of a preternaturally large range of mid-20th-century British accents and voices" in "a brilliant vocal manifestation of Waugh's acidly comic world." Compare Patrick Query's reviews of the same audio-books, the trilogy read by Rodska in "Waughdio, Part 2," EWS 44.2 (Autumn 2013): 28-30, and Sword of Honour read by Prebble in "Waughdio, Part 3," EWS 44.3 (Winter 2014): 23-24.
For a long time while living in the American Midwest, I could not go to the movies for fear of triggering a two-week bout of homesickness on hearing British accents in a movie, but my fear subsided once I got a TV and happened upon re-runs of Are You Being Served?
Some are wacky, some are wild, and some simply speak in British accents, but all are vivid and well done.

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