cosmic microwave background radiation

(redirected from Cosmic microwave radiation)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Cosmic microwave radiation: cosmic background radiation

cosmic microwave background radiation

n.
Microwave radiation that penetrates space throughout the universe, postulated to be residual electromagnetic radiation originally emitted by warm matter in the universe approximately 400,000 years after the Big Bang. Also called cosmic background radiation, cosmic microwave background, microwave background.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cosmic microwave background radiation - (cosmology) the cooled remnant of the hot big bang that fills the entire universe and can be observed today with an average temperature of about 2.725 kelvin
cosmogeny, cosmogony, cosmology - the branch of astrophysics that studies the origin and evolution and structure of the universe
cosmic radiation - radiation coming from outside the solar system
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Looking at cosmic microwave radiation, modern satellite observatories like COBE, WMAP and Planck have gradually refined our understanding of the composition of the universe, and the most recent measurements suggest it consists of 4.9% 'normal' matter (i.e.
They will draw chiefly on cosmic microwave radiation data from ESA's Planck Surveyor and the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (established in the desert in Northern Chile).
The telescope has delivered the most detailed ever picture of cosmic microwave radiation - the afterglow of the Big Bang which triggered the creation of the universe - and caused astrophysicists to rethink what they know about the universe and add 50 million years on to its age.