Dutch Reformed Church

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Related to Dutch Protestant: Nederlandse Hervormde Kerk

Dutch Reformed Church

n
(Protestantism) any of the three Calvinist Churches to which most Afrikaans-speaking South Africans belong
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Like the Battle of Lepanto, the defeat of the 'formidable flotilla' of Dutch Protestant ships in Manila in 1646 is attributed as 'victory for the rosary' by Fr.
He illustrates this divide with two mid-seventeenth-century views of church interiors: the first, by the Belgian Catholic painter Pieter Neefs the Elder, showing the image-rich aisles of Antwerpen Cathedral, the other, by the Dutch Protestant artist Pieter Jansz Saenredam, displaying the minimalist austerity of the whitewashed walls of Saint Odulphus in Assendelft.
"It really forms the Dutch man," he said of growing up as a Dutch Protestant. "Sustainability, you would say nowadays.
With the lasting and even growing divisions in the Dutch Protestant world, NBG had to be cautious, and the first article of its constitution forbade all changes and explanations, even the addition of chapter titles, to the sacrosanct text of the Bible.
The Glorious Revolution in 1688 which saw England's Roman Catholic king James II chased out of England brought hope for Nonconformists as the new king and queen were Dutch Protestant William of Orange and his English wife Mary.
The Dutch model was exported to Britain in 1688, along with the political revolution that deposed the Catholic James II and put the Dutch Protestant William of Orange on the English throne.
Because of its hesitation to speak out in favor of organizing workers to represent their material interests, historians such as Piet Hazenbosch consider the first Christian Social Congress at most to be an indirect impulse to the organization of the Dutch Protestant workers.
The story that Mary n and her Dutch Protestant husband William m had providentially rescued the nation from Papist absolutism in 1688-89 proved to be a problem.
Mochizuki has provided an excellent introduction in English to the subject of Dutch Protestant church furnishing, magnificently illustrated, marred somewhat by fashionable language that "preferences" (217) shifty paradigms, bodies, objecthood, materiality, memoriality, and fundamental subversion.
With a focus on Dutch Protestant immigrants in the Midwest, he discusses how Dutch-Americans maintained their subculture, and the role of religion, community building, family, work, maintaining and adapting the language and forms of media, external communication with the Netherlands, and participation in American politics.
Consideration of popular Dutch Protestant literature in this essay will seek to demonstrate that, contrary to nineteenth-and twentieth-century interpretations, seventeenth-century Protestant orthodoxy did teach an actual presence of Christ.
William of Orange, a Dutch Protestant, had seized the crowns of England and Scotland from Catholic James II.