English self

English self

n
(Breeds) a breed of short-haired guinea pig that is a single colour throughout
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoffman admits that her English self, which is "refracted through the double distance of English and writing" is "oddly objective; more than anything, it perceives" (1989: 121).
In the second exchange the Polish and English self discuss a musical career:
Understandably Labour MPs - particularly Scottish MPs like Alistair Darling and Gordon Brown - are alarmed at the idea of any English self rule.
She focuses on his reaction to the English Self in the early modern period from political, social, and cultural viewpoints.
Yet the underlying matrix is surprisingly similar: in all, racial trespassing raises new perspectives and thus implicitly parochializes the English self. Here the most trespassing racial figure is also the most cosmopolitan modern figure, for Fu Manchu has, for instance, mastered the urban spaces and technologies of global and British modernity.
This same syncretism allowed the English self, as figured in the romance, to incorporate elements of the other for its own purposes.
Through her diary, Hoffman is able to come to terms with her intersecting selves: her Polish (past) self, her emerging (present and future) English self, and her (future) imagined Polish self.
My English self and my French self exist side by side, and cannot be harmonised, despite both being me.
How might the embodied English self in the age of colonialism begin to look different as a result?
Hence, when excitement comes onto the scene and the affective filter is activated, they rely on their first self (in this case, the Portuguese one) since they do not have feelings or emotions in their on-building "English self." Yet they have enough knowledge of the language to express themselves in such situations.
In chapter 2, she observes that "Rebecca" and other Hebrew matriarchs are imaginative renderings of Jewish mothers who are not presented as "unnatural." These figures are not lactating men who also bleed but instead are "the most 'natural' and pure origin of the English self" (53).