fiefdom

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fief·dom

 (fēf′dəm)
n.
1. The estate or domain of a feudal lord.
2. An organization or department over which one dominant person or group exercises control.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

fiefdom

(ˈfiːfdəm)
n
1. (in feudal Europe) the property owned by a lord
2. an area over which a person or organization exerts authority or influence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

fief•dom

(ˈfif dəm)

n.
1. the estate or domain of a feudal lord.
2. anything owned by one dominant person or group.
[1805–15]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

fiefdom

Medieval History. the land over which a person exercises control after vows of vassalage and service to an overlord. See feudalism.
See also: Land
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fiefdom - the domain controlled by a feudal lord
demesne, domain, land - territory over which rule or control is exercised; "his domain extended into Europe"; "he made it the law of the land"
2.fiefdom - an organization that is controlled by a dominant person or group
organization, organisation - a group of people who work together
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

fiefdom

[ˈfiːfdəm] Nfeudo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
This meant that the fiefholder had no right to dispose freely of "his" land but could only enjoy its exploitation for definite purposes.(64) Property was conditional.
Many fiefholders converted to Christianity, bringing into the Roman Catholic Church their armed followers, and their agricultural and artisan classes.