Bantustan

(redirected from Homeland (South Africa))
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Ban·tu·stan

 (băn′to͞o-stăn′)
n.
1. Any of the homelands formerly established for blacks in South Africa by the government during the apartheid era.
2. A landlocked, often fragmented ethnic enclave within a larger state, nominally possessing some degree of autonomy but usually economically dependent and lacking real power.

[From Bantu (on the model of Hindustan).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Bantustan

(ˈbɑːntʊˌstɑːn; ˌbæntʊˈstɑːn)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (formerly, in South Africa) an area reserved for occupation by a Black African people, with limited self-government; abolished in 1993. Official name: homeland
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

home•land

(ˈhoʊmˌlænd, -lənd)

n.
1. one's native land.
2. a region created or considered as a state by or for a particular ethnic group: the Palestinian homeland.
3. any of the racially and ethnically based regions created in South Africa by the government as nominally independent tribal states.
[1660–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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