Kantianism


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Kantianism

the philosophy of Emmanuel Kant, asserting that the nature of the mind renders it unable to know reality immediately, that the mind interprets data presented to it as phenomena in space and time, and that the reason, in order to find a meaningful basis for experience or in order for ethical conduct to exist, may postulate things unknowable to it, as the existence of a soul. — Kantist, n.Kantian, adj.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Also, because of its latent individualistic elitism, Kantianism cannot fully control the technological imperative.
Gottlieb argues that turning to British Romanticism supplies a special case-study for this kind of ontological description because "the Speculative Realists jointly seek to break thought out of its Kantian prison and free us to speculate once more on reality itself" and, "since they were writing at a moment when Kantianism was not yet hegemonic, the Romantic poets already enjoyed such freedom, albeit to varying degrees" (231).
Along the way, McCloskey takes aim at ethical systems, specifically Kantianism, utilitarianism, and contractarianism, which reduce morality to one simple rule.
The twenty informed and informative articles comprising this outstanding volume collectively approach the question of how to do philosophy from a wide range of perspectives, including conceptual analysis, critical theory, deconstruction, experimental philosophy, hermeneutics, Kantianism, methodological naturalism, phenomenology, and pragmatism.
For instance, they classify both Kantianism and utilitarianism under the template of respect, while they regard Aristotelian virtue ethics as falling under the template of responsibility (p.
(166) Examples of top-down rules include Asimov's laws, utilitarianism, Kantianism, egoism, virtue ethics, and the Ten Commandments.
Uniting Kantianism and Neo-Kantianism in unique ways, he disrupts the Kantian notion of "unbroken progress" (130) and rejects, with some adjustments, Kant's conceptions of practical and instrumental reason (125).
In Chapter 7, Kaspar argues that intuitionism is superior to Kantianism, utilitarianism, and virtue ethics.
Even Christian apologists like Gianni Vattimo and John Caputo capitulate to such Kantianism by postulating God as incarnate in the "event" which however lacks an ongoing "real presence" (261).
Peikoff formally defines DIM in his fourth chapter, "DIM and the Hypothesis." By this time, he has explained the three most influential philosophies in Western history, those being Platonism, which holds that we acquire knowledge by contemplating an allegedly higher reality of perfect "forms"; Aristotelianism, which holds that we acquire knowledge by logically integrating our perceptual observations; and Kantianism, which holds that our minds construct what we think of as "reality." Peikoff explains that M refers to "the Platonic mode 'misintegration,'" I refers to "the Aristotelian mode" of integration, and D refers to "the Kantian mode 'disintegration'" (pp.