knacker


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms, Wikipedia.

knack·er

 (năk′ər)
n. Chiefly British
1. A person who buys worn-out or old livestock and slaughters them to sell the meat or hides.
2. A person who buys unwanted structures, such as houses or ships, and dismantles them to sell the materials.

[Probably of Scandinavian origin.]

knack′er·y (-ə-rē) n.

knacker

(ˈnækə)
n
1. a person who buys up old horses for slaughter
2. a person who buys up old buildings and breaks them up for scrap
3. (Anatomy) (usually plural) slang another word for testicle
4. slang Irish a despicable person
vb
(tr; usually passive) slang to exhaust; tire
[C16: probably from nacker saddler, probably of Scandinavian origin; compare Old Norse hnakkur saddle]

knack•er

(ˈnæk ər)

n. Brit.
1. a person who buys animal carcasses or slaughters useless livestock for a rendering works.
2. a person who buys and dismembers old houses, ships, etc., to salvage usable parts, selling the rest as scrap.
[1565–75; -knack earlier, a saddlemaker, perhaps (< Scandinavian; compare Icelandic hnakkr nape of the neck, saddle) + -er1]

knacker

British. a person who purchases old structures and disassembles them for salvageable materials and scrap.
See also: Buildings

knacker


Past participle: knackered
Gerund: knackering

Imperative
knacker
knacker
Present
I knacker
you knacker
he/she/it knackers
we knacker
you knacker
they knacker
Preterite
I knackered
you knackered
he/she/it knackered
we knackered
you knackered
they knackered
Present Continuous
I am knackering
you are knackering
he/she/it is knackering
we are knackering
you are knackering
they are knackering
Present Perfect
I have knackered
you have knackered
he/she/it has knackered
we have knackered
you have knackered
they have knackered
Past Continuous
I was knackering
you were knackering
he/she/it was knackering
we were knackering
you were knackering
they were knackering
Past Perfect
I had knackered
you had knackered
he/she/it had knackered
we had knackered
you had knackered
they had knackered
Future
I will knacker
you will knacker
he/she/it will knacker
we will knacker
you will knacker
they will knacker
Future Perfect
I will have knackered
you will have knackered
he/she/it will have knackered
we will have knackered
you will have knackered
they will have knackered
Future Continuous
I will be knackering
you will be knackering
he/she/it will be knackering
we will be knackering
you will be knackering
they will be knackering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been knackering
you have been knackering
he/she/it has been knackering
we have been knackering
you have been knackering
they have been knackering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been knackering
you will have been knackering
he/she/it will have been knackering
we will have been knackering
you will have been knackering
they will have been knackering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been knackering
you had been knackering
he/she/it had been knackering
we had been knackering
you had been knackering
they had been knackering
Conditional
I would knacker
you would knacker
he/she/it would knacker
we would knacker
you would knacker
they would knacker
Past Conditional
I would have knackered
you would have knackered
he/she/it would have knackered
we would have knackered
you would have knackered
they would have knackered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.knacker - someone who buys old buildings or ships and breaks them up to recover the materials in them
wrecker - someone who demolishes or dismantles buildings as a job
2.knacker - someone who buys up old horses for slaughter
slaughterer, butcher - a person who slaughters or dresses meat for market
Translations

knacker

[ˈnækəʳ] (Brit)
A. N (for horses) → matarife mf de caballos; (for ships) → desguazador(a) m/f
B. VTagotar, reventar
I'm knackeredestoy reventado or hecho polvo
C. CPD knacker's yard N (for horses) → matadero m; (for ships) → desguace m

knacker

n (Brit inf, of horses) → Abdecker(in) m(f), → Schinder(in) m(f); (of boats, houses)Abbruchunternehmer(in) m(f); to send a horse to the knacker’s (yard)ein Pferd zum Abdecker or auf den Schindanger (old)bringen
References in classic literature ?
When it was discovered that the knacker and tanner would give only a very few shillings for Prince's carcase because of his decrepitude, Durbeyfield rose to the occasion.
I have seen dead horses, and I am sure they do not suffer pain; I wish I may drop down dead at my work, and not be sent off to the knackers."
Mrs Ann Elliott disagrees with the NGRC's proposal to ban knacker meat
THE Stewards of the National Greyhound Racing Club are considering a ban on the use of all knacker meat following confirmation that the death of 12 greyhounds under the care of Perry Barr trainer Francis O'Hare was due to a cocktail of local anaesthetics and barbiturates normally used as a humane killer for horses.
Haynes said: "The whole issue of feeding knacker meat and the risks of dogs producing positive samples from it was explained to us in great detail.
The drug is commonly used for treating horses with colic, which clearly points to knacker meat as the source of contamination.
Kathleen Lawrence was studying in a common area in Dublin City University on Monday when she overheard a student say "knacker".
[USA], Jan 13 (ANI): Turns out, cycling doesn't knacker your knackers.
So by 2014 and China's Year of the Horse he should be in the political knacker's yard.
PLAID Cymru yesterday refused to apologise for calling Labour Caerphilly candidate Jeff Cuthbert a "three-legged carthorse" who should be sent to the "knacker's yard".
A 'knacker' is consistently defined as someone buying horses for slaughter and trading in their flesh and hides.
The Boy Johnny Hopkins Knacker Marry Maguire Bella Natalie Brown Lillian Tim Rudy Credit Marie Jones with a light touch and a rare gift for character developmeat: The first act of her new play "Rock Doves" approaches the whimsy of her pleasant 2001 Broadway two-hander "Stones in His Pockets." More's the pity, then, that the audience returns from intermission to find a succession of artificial plot twists clumsily covered over with cheap sentiment.