Lancelot

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Related to Lancelot of the Lake: Lancelot du Lac

Lan·ce·lot

 (lăn′sə-lət, -lŏt′, län′-)
n.
In Arthurian legend, a Knight of the Round Table whose love affair with Queen Guinevere resulted in a war with King Arthur.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Lancelot

(ˈlɑːnslət)
n
(European Myth & Legend) (in Arthurian legend) one of the Knights of the Round Table; the lover of Queen Guinevere
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Lan•ce•lot

(ˈlæn sə lət, -ˌlɒt, ˈlɑn-)

n.
Sir, the greatest of King Arthur's knights and the lover of Queen Guinevere.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Lancelot - (Arthurian legend) one of the knights of the Round TableLancelot - (Arthurian legend) one of the knights of the Round Table; friend of King Arthur until (according to some versions of the legend) he became the lover of Arthur's wife Guinevere
Arthurian legend - the legend of King Arthur and his court at Camelot
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Lancelot

[ˈlɑːnslət] NLanzarote
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Born in Arcachon, France, Balsan started his career as an actor in Robert Bresson's "Lancelot of the Lake," which won the Fipresci Prize at Cannes in 1974, and went on to work with helmers Jacques Rivette, Maurice Pialat and Pierre Granier-Deferre before turning his hand to producing.
Cunneen argues that Bresson is not a "religious" cinematographer in any obvious sense, although religious themes naturally come to the fore in Angels of Sin (1943), Diary of a Country Priest (1951), The Trial of Joan of Arc (1962), and Lancelot of the Lake (1974).
We were happily amused as we strolled down streets named "The Fairy Viviane," "The Knights of the Round Table," and "Sir Lancelot of the Lake."