Politicalism

Po`lit´i`cal`ism


n.1.Zeal or party spirit in politics.
Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary, published 1913 by G. & C. Merriam Co.
References in periodicals archive ?
I find in MacNeice's writing more of Yeats' poeticalness than of his politicalism. Much more of that could have been acquired in Yeats' autobiographical memoirs, especially the one entitled "Ireland After Parnell" in which he describes his transformation of those Protestant "roots." But the most important findings of the book are not those concerning famous politicians or poets, but rather the data of ordinary Protestants.
The most striking aspect of these images is the worker's innate politicalism. To be a worker was to naturally vote Labor, rather than side with his previous liberal patrons.
Thus, although precipitated by the conscription issue, the dramatic 1916 split in the party embodied a more deep-seated revolt against "politicalism," as Childe called it, the strategy of pursuing power in the parliamentary arena alone.
The effect of "politicalism" (parliamentarism) by 1920 was to consolidate a specific political identity for the organized working class, an uneasy mixture of institutionalized class mobilization, via the unions and the party, and passive, individualized support for parliamentary socialism.
The African media have undergone many changes from the days of colonial rule to multiparty politicalism, one-party states and unity role to democracy again.
Informed by Labor's disastrous wartime experience and the internecine conflux that rocked its NSW branch during the early 1920s, Childe's How Labour Governs (1923) diagnosed Labor's failings as a parliamentary working-class party--a strategy he termed 'politicalism'.
(43) Perhaps the most striking departure from the established Bulletin and Boomerang models was Scott's sense of the worker's innate politicalism. To be a worker was to naturally vote Labor, rather than side with his previous patrons, the radical liberals.
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