Received Pronunciation


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Received Pronunciation

n.
A pronunciation of British English, originally based on the speech of the upper class of southeastern England and characteristic of the English spoken at private boarding schools and at Oxford and Cambridge Universities. Until the late 1900s, it was the standard form of English used in British broadcasting. Also called Received Standard.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Received Pronunciation

n
(Phonetics & Phonology) the accent of standard Southern British English. Abbreviation: RP
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Received′ Pronuncia′tion


n.
a pronunciation of British English derived from the educated speech of S England, traditionally used in the public schools and at Oxford and Cambridge universities and widely used in broadcasting. Abbr.: RP
[1865–70]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Received Pronunciation - the approved pronunciation of British English; originally based on the King's English as spoken at public schools and at Oxford and Cambridge Universities (and widely accepted elsewhere in Britain); until recently it was the pronunciation of English used in British broadcasting
English, English language - an Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the commonwealth countries
orthoepy, pronunciation - the way a word or a language is customarily spoken; "the pronunciation of Chinese is difficult for foreigners"; "that is the correct pronunciation"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

received pronunciation

nhochsprachliche Aussprache
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Received Pronunciation

npronuncia standard (dell'inglese)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The naivete, excited and regal soundtrack and patriotic narrative, with its received pronunciation narration, of the Pathe newsreels of that time are not as bygone as we might think.
He is for our generation one of the best representatives of what we know as Received Pronunciation (RP).
A Recognised pronunciation B Real pronunciation C Received pronunciation D Rich pronunciation 12.
Similarly, just as most Americans use a soft 't' in words like water and butter, Meg now says these in the RP (received pronunciation) way," the insider added.
Dr Alexander Baratta, an expert on the subject at Manchester University, reckons accentism - the pressure on people with regional accents to assume a mode of speaking closer to received pronunciation - is the last taboo.
Dr Alexander Baratta, an expert on the subject at Manchester University, reckons accentism -- the pressure on people with regional accents to assume a mode of speaking closer to received pronunciation -- is the last taboo.
At the time, and for years afterwards, characters and presenters on the BBC tended to speak in standard, Received Pronunciation. Tyne Tees would help change that.
His Yorkshire accent was a novelty when most people on TV spoke in received pronunciation and he was like a cheeky older brother, full of enthusiasm.
The sound files are searchable, which makes precise queries easy to pin down, although many insights arise just by browsing--such as the clarification that in the name of Titus Andronicus's Tamora, the stress falls on the first syllable, not the penultimate one (551); the rhyming of juice with voice or boy (304); or the prevalence of the post-vocalic /r/ that an accent such as the Shakespeare-on-stage 'standard' Received Pronunciation (RP) has little trace of today (unlike accents such as General American or Hiberno-English which still retain the rhoticity).
Received pronunciation - the standard form of British English pronunciation, based on educated speech in southern England and widely accepted as a standard elsewhere - (74 per cent), Northern Irish (70 per cent) and Southern Irish (70 per cent) rounded off the top four.
Clive Upton's chapter on British English first addresses the model English accent called Received Pronunciation (RP).

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