Schneider Trophy


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Schneider Trophy

(ˈʃnaɪdə)
n
(Aeronautics) a trophy for air racing between seaplanes of any nation, first presented by Jacques Schneider (1879–1928) in 1913; won outright by Britain in 1931
References in periodicals archive ?
The Lion, in modified form, had powered several of the Supermarine competitors in the Schneider Trophy air races and several land speed record cars.
SKIES ABOVE BRITAIN BBC2, 8pm Racing champion Martin, who is a member of Britain's oldest flying club The Royal Aero Club, prepares to compete for the Schneider Trophy, in which 14 pilots will fly around outlying islands in Alderney in the Channel Islands.
Skies Above Britain BBC Two, 8pm Racing champion Martin, who is a member of the Royal Aero Club - Britain's oldest flying establishment - prepares to compete for the Schneider Trophy, in which 14 pilots will fly around outlying islands in Alderney in the Channel Islands.
In the late 30s there was a trophy called the Schneider Trophy, which was basically to find the fastest aeroplane in the world.
The Spitfire was, in fact, the end product of a progressive development of a series aircraft designed by R J Mitchell and entered into the pre war Schneider Trophy by Supermarine.
The Schneider Trophy race includes light and vintage aircraft and has been a long-standing fixture on the island.
The planes were among 19 aircraft taking part in the Merlin Trophy races, the precursor to the Schneider Trophy race, which dates back to 1913.
The planes were among 19 aircraft taking part in Saturday's Merlin Trophy races, the precursor for today's main annual Schneider Trophy, which has been cancelled.
He also cited the success of the Schneider Trophy for seaplane development in the 1920s where teams sometimes received government money and as well as pilots on loan from the Royal Air Force.
THE Spitfirewas designed byRJ Mitchell, originallyasaseaplane to competeforthe Schneider Trophy.
Under his guidance the company would win air speed award the Schneider Trophy an unbeaten three times, retaining the cup permanently for Britain.