scintillation counter

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scintillation counter

n.
A device for detecting and counting scintillations produced by ionizing radiation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

scintillation counter

n
(General Physics) an instrument for detecting and measuring the intensity of high-energy radiation. It consists of a phosphor with which particles collide producing flashes of light that are detected by a photomultiplier and converted into pulses of electric current that are counted by electronic equipment
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

scintilla′tion count`er


n.
a device that measures radioactivity by registering the number of scintillations it produces.
Also called scin•til•lom•e•ter (sin`tl om′i tər).
[1945–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.scintillation counter - counter tube in which light flashes when exposed to ionizing radiation
counter tube - a measuring instrument for counting individual ionizing events
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If the energy resolution is sufficiently high, we can distinguish the radiation species with very close emission energies in practical applications as scintillation counters. For example, the [gamma]-ray energies of [sup.134]Cs and [sup.137]Cs are 604 and 662 keV, respectively, and a sufficiently high energy resolution is required to distinguish these two peaks in pulse-height spectrum.
"The solid-state thermal neutron detector provides improvements in sensitivity, size, weight, power consumption, operator safety, transportability and cost compared to other available detectors such as gas proportional counters and scintillation counters," McGinnis said.
Among their topics are scintillation counters, sample preparation, statistics of counting, health hazards and protection, and radiochemical separation techniques.