Spanish-American


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Spanish American

also Span·ish-A·mer·i·can (spăn′ĭsh-ə-mĕr′ĭ-kən)
n.
1. A native or inhabitant of Spanish America.
2. A US citizen or resident of Hispanic ancestry. See Usage Note at Hispanic.
adj. Spanish-American
1. Of or relating to Spanish America or its peoples or cultures.
2. Of or relating to Spain and America, especially the United States.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Spanish-American

adj
1. (Placename) of or relating to any of the Spanish-speaking countries or peoples of the Americas
2. (Peoples) of or relating to any of the Spanish-speaking countries or peoples of the Americas
n
3. (Peoples) a native or inhabitant of Spanish America
4. (Languages) a Spanish-speaking person in the US
5. (Peoples) a Spanish-speaking person in the US
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Span′ish Amer′ican


n.
1. a citizen or resident of the U.S. of Spanish birth or descent.
2. a descendant of the Spanish-speaking population in parts of Mexico annexed by the U.S. as a result of the Texas revolt and the Mexican War.
3. a native or inhabitant of Spanish America.

Span′ish-Amer′ican



adj.
1. of or pertaining to Spanish America or its inhabitants.
2. belonging to, pertaining to, or involving both Spain and the U.S., or the people of the two countries.
3. of or pertaining to Spanish Americans.
[1780–90, Amer.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
In the general rejoicing throughout the country which followed the close of the Spanish-American war, peace celebrations were arranged in several of the large cities.
And then he made his eloquent appeal to the consciences of the white Americans: "When you have gotten the full story or the heroic conduct of the Negro in the Spanish-American war, have heard it from the lips of Northern soldier and Southern soldier, from ex-abolitionist and ex-masters, then decide within yourselves whether a race that is thus willing to die for its country should not be given the highest opportunity to live for its country."
The part of the speech which seems to arouse the wildest and most sensational enthusiasm was that in which I thanked the President for his recognition of the Negro in his appointments during the Spanish-American war.
It is suggestive that Anthony is not a common name in England, while Antonio is so in all Spanish or Spanish-American countries.
Synopsis: "US Navy Battleships 1886--98: The Pre-Dreadnoughts and Monitors that Fought the Spanish-American War" by Brian Lane Herder is fully illustrated study examines the US's first six battleships.
The Philippines was a colony of Spain for almost 400 years until 1898 with Spain's defeat in the Spanish-American War.
Van Atta, who teaches American history at a college preparatory school, describes the Battle of San Juan Hill, focusing on Theodore Roosevelt and his Rough Riders, as well as the political aftermath of the Spanish-American War and the cultural shift toward an overseas empire by a republican nation whose original political identity was created in revolutionary defiance of imperial power.
The 46 newly discovered flags including banners from battles in Asia and from the Spanish-American War had originally been put on display in 1913.
The 1898 Spanish-American War artillery battery fort was one of four forts on St.
The 1898 Battle of San Juan Hill, the decisive battle of the Spanish-American War, was fought on which island?