Strangers' Gallery

strangers' gallery

n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) another name for public gallery
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

Strangers’ Gallery

n (Brit Parl) → Besuchergalerie f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
The strangers' gallery, which was immediately above the door of the House, had been ordered to be closed on the first rumour of disturbance, and was empty; save that now and then Lord George took his seat there, for the convenience of coming to the head of the stairs which led to it, and repeating to the people what had passed within.
WORDWISE: C WHO AM I: Meera Syal 10 QUESTIONS: 1 Aston Villa, 2 Strangers' Gallery, 3 Thigh, 4 TV scripts (and plays), 5 12, 6 1844, 7 David Bowie, 8 Linguine, 9 Orsay Museum (Musee d'Orsay), 10 Julian Barnes
SIR - Along with many people I watched the debate live from the House of Commons, a place I have been fortunate to visit courtesy of many Members via the Strangers' Gallery. It is likened to a "bear pit", however, I was very disappointed with the treatment meted out to Jeremy Corbyn by the Tories.
The Strangers' Gallery. Halifax: Vagrant Press, 2013.
Victory was worth pounds 1.2million, and the vultures gathered in the strangers' gallery, which doubles as a directors' box.
Two flour bombs were hurled from the Strangers' Gallery by a pair of Fathers 4 Justice campaigners.
You probably noticed how the two demonstrating dads who flung condoms filled with purple flour at the Prime Minister obtained their seats in the Strangers' Gallery thanks to a raffle.
It is ironic that the major breach of security at Westminster occurred only a few weeks after a pounds 500,000 glass screen was erected in the Strangers' Gallery specifically to guard against the hurling of missiles into the Chamber.
Last week I took my 11-year-old son Dominic to Parliament and we watched Prime Minister's Questions from the Strangers' Gallery, where the public sit on the opposite side of the Chamber.
Two flour bombs were hurled by two Fathers 4 Justice campaigners who had been admitted to the Strangers' Gallery after winning tickets in a charity raffle.
It is ironic yesterday's major breach of security at Westminster occurred only a few weeks after a pounds 500,000 glass screen was erected in the Strangers' Gallery specifically to guard against the hurling of missiles into the Chamber.