World Conservation Strategy


Also found in: Wikipedia.

World Conservation Strategy

A strategy launched (1980) by the IUCN and WWF to help nations protect ecosystems.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
It was a response to the World Conservation Strategy in 1980 and subsequent UNEP led expert meetings in 1980s.
At IUCN, too, he helped to shape the seminal World Conservation Strategy with Robert Prescott-Allen, presenting what is still one of the clearest arguments for sustainable development and its ecological foundations.
(23) The 1980 World Conservation Strategy, prepared by WWF and IUCN officials, claimed that 'local commitment to a protected area can only be assured through provision of local advantages such as increased opportunities for employment and commerce' and that any local community 'should be involved in the protected area from the start.' (24) In 1982, delegates from the IUCN-sponsored World Congress on National Parks called for
(43) At the same time, the IUCN forged close ties with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), receiving critical financial support from the UN and embarking on such high-profile projects as the drafting and launch of the World Conservation Strategy in 1980.
In 1980 the International Union for the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) in collaboration with the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) and the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) published the World Conservation Strategy. This document, subtitled "natural resource conservation for sustainable development", precipitated national and local conservation strategies around the world--including one in Australia in 1983 (DHAE, 1984).
The Brundtland Commission, and the World Conservation Strategy before it, were concerned that human socio-economic development was placing such burdens on the biosphere's ability to support life that a different way of development was needed: one that would enable everyone to live well, and within the Earth's ability to support us--now and in the future.
In the Introduction to the World Conservation Strategy (WCS 1980)--one of the pioneering global resource management documents--conservation is defined as "the management of the human use of the biosphere so that it may yield the greatest sustainable benefit to present generations while maintaining its potential to meet the needs and aspirations of future generations.
Nor did it question the evident support for Thailand as host nation for the upcoming World Conservation Strategy conference, knowing that in principle Thailand condones evictions.
I first came across the concept of sustainable (in a very minor way) with the UR response to the World Conservation Strategy in 1983, and was particularly fond of Joan Davidson and Ann MacEwen's wonderful contribution on `Livable Cities' (and how reassuring to see it all re-emerging as liveability -- this time with an `e').
Non-governmental and international organizations, such as the International Union for the conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (IUCN) and the UN, prepared the World Conservation Strategy (1980) and the World Charter for Nature (1982).
The World Conservation Strategy (1980) was prepared by IUCN in cooperation with WWF and the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP).
the World Conservation Strategy, 1980; the various ICOMOS Charters; and the call for a 12% quota of protected lands.
Full browser ?