anthropomorphous


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an·thro·po·mor·phous

 (ăn′thrə-pə-môr′fəs)
adj.
1. Having or suggesting human form and appearance.
2. Ascribing human motivation, characteristics, or behavior to things not human, such as inanimate objects, animals, or natural phenomena.

an′thro·po·mor′phous·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

anthropomorphous

(ˌænθrəpəˈmɔːfəs)
adj
1. shaped like a human being
2. another word for anthropomorphic
ˌanthropoˈmorphously adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.anthropomorphous - suggesting human characteristics for animals or inanimate thingsanthropomorphous - suggesting human characteristics for animals or inanimate things
human - having human form or attributes as opposed to those of animals or divine beings; "human beings"; "the human body"; "human kindness"; "human frailty"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

anthropomorphous

adjective
Resembling a human being:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

anthropomorphous

[ˌænθrəʊpəˈmɔːfəs] ADJantropomorfo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
Originally a reptile inhabiting fire; later, an anthropomorphous immortal, but still a pyrophile.
One crucial point that arises in this discussion concerns the distinction, largely ignored or glossed over by new animist theorists (see e.g., Arhem 2016) but clearly revealed in Nage ethnography, between on the one hand, the possession by humans, animals, and plants of their own life--and possibly an interior essence (sometimes expressed as 'soul') linked with personhood and intentional agency--and, on the other hand, the representation of certain things as being inhabited by or otherwise associated with anthropomorphous and seemingly animate free spirits (in Nage called nitu).
A good example of cases in which scholars actually engage with the camera on the grounds of embodied cognition is the so-called "anthropomorphous camera" (Brinckmann 276-301, in particular her discussion of Hollywood cinema starting 293; Kuhn).
In particular, the completely computer-generated Rocket is brought to life with some great one-liners and never gets irritating unlike the vast majority of movie anthropomorphous sidekicks.
The professor accidentally gave his anthropomorphous robot a built-in flaw: he burst into flame upon contact with oxygen.