archiphoneme

Related to archiphoneme: Phonemes

archiphoneme

(ˈɑːkɪˌfəʊniːm; ˌɑːkɪˈfəʊniːm)
n
(Phonetics & Phonology) phonetics an abstract linguistic unit representing two or more phonemes when the distinction between these has been neutralized: conventionally shown by a capital letter within slashes, as /T/ for /t/ and /d/ in German Rat and Rad
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations

archiphoneme

[ˈɑːkɪˌfəʊniːm] Narchifonema m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
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References in periodicals archive ?
tun 'to work', but tun + =pe -> tumpe 'worker' miin 'to come', but miin + -p -> miimp 'I come' wiin 'eye' but wiin + ki'ix -> wiinki'ix 'dark circles around eyes' [wi:n'gi?is] Following Dieterman (2008), the alveolar nasal could be regarded as an archiphoneme in morpheme-final position, always assimilating in place of articulation to the following segment.
They therefore presuppose that there is still signification beyond presence and absence, meaning that nonpresence still signifies something, it posits itself as an "arche-trace," a sort of archiphoneme between presence and absence.
As seen in (60a), the vowel height features of the root shift onto the prefix, here the class 3 archiphoneme /U-/:
In addition to the Mexbet phonemes, Cuetara also proposed the inclusion of the archiphonemes /_D/, AG/, /_N/ and /_R/ to define the neutralization of the following couples of phonemes: /d/-/t/, /g/-/k/, /n/-/m/, and /r/-/r/ [30].
Most briefly put, what we find in this chapter are neither phonemes, allophones, morphophonemes, nor archiphonemes: they are noises, and as a consequence the chapter does not really deal with phonology at all.
For the Mexican Spanish, the inclusion of the archiphonemes /_D/, /_G/, /_N/, and /_R/ in Mexbet was proposed to define the neutralization of the following couples of phonemes: /d/-/t/, /g/-/k/, /n/-/m/, and /u/-/r/ [25].
Yet the Arab scholars who devised the system of harakat were in fact basing themselves on a phonemic principle: the vowel qualities of fath, damm, and kasr are essentially archiphonemes capable of a variety of phonetic realizations.
This change is reflected in the exclusion of the letter for voiced g from the short alphabet, in which represents both archiphonemes. But the letter indicating the postvelar in the long alphabet, h, is used for the sound resulting from the merger of the unvoiced counterparts.