banalization

banalization

(bəˌnɑːlaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

banalisation

n
the process of becoming or making something banal
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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References in periodicals archive ?
Whatever the merits of their arguments, which cannot be discussed in this article, these critics also miss the point: whether or not Mallarme succeeded in stripping language of its conventional meanings, his intention was certainly to combat, through the purification and spiritualization of language, the banalization of taste incarnated in the formulaic productions aimed at the masses.
They never aimed at making cultural news more easily digestible to readers, which would have implied a banalization of culture.
The increase and banalization of violence begin to be everyday in big cities, revealing, paradoxically, the incapacity of electoral democracy to generate social cohesion mechanisms.
It would not be forcing the meaning of Zertal's argumentation to define as its motive, not an underestimation of the importance of the Shoah in Jewish consciousness and contemporary history, but rather a revolt against the instrumentalization and even the banalization of the Shoah, (20) which deprive it of its historical reality and dispossess its victims while promoting its imagined imminence in a completely different political conjuncture--thereby rendering the violence and crimes of the present invisible and inconceivable, given the effect of disproportion.
Indeed, Israel's critics in Europe are indulging in a frivolous banalization when they compare the recent Gaza conflict or the battle of Jenin in 2002 aC" with its 58 casualties among Palestinian combatants (Israel lost 25 soldiers) aC" to Auschwitz, a death factory where 30,000 Jews were slaughtered daily.
or for the banalization of barbaric events," Judge Juliana Ka= lichszteim said, upholding a complaint by the city's Jewish community.
In some instances the tone becomes openly polemic, as in Jean-Louis Sarthou's description of the linguistic 'banalization' imposed upon translators by the dictates of mass distribution networks.
It has led to a proliferation of works of representation and re-memorialization which have brought in their wake concerns about a "holocaust industry" and banalization. This volume discusses some of the issues, such as the question of silence and denial, of the formation of contemporary identities--German, East European, Jewish or Israeli, the consequences of the legacy of the Shoah for survivors and for the "second generation," and the political, ideological, and professional implications of Shoah historiography.
Michael Ignatieff has characterized such enthusiasm as a tendency towards banalization and therefore a weakening of the concept's practical effectivity: rather than operating as a 'validation of every kind of victimhood,' it should, he suggests, be reserved for 'genuine' horrors and barbarisms (Ignatieff 2001:27).
The result of this "banalization" and other formal methods of erasure, according to Trouillot, is the writing out of history of the Haitian Revolution.
Is the banalization of personal experience through exposure of it a fair price to pay for relief from the isolation and shame it produces?
WE all act to obscure our complicity in the banalization of the cultural world, and in the social and economic arrangements reinforced by that world.