eminency


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em·i·nen·cy

 (ĕm′ə-nən-sē)
n. pl. em·i·nen·cies
Eminence.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

em•i•nence

(ˈɛm ə nəns)

n.
1. high station, rank, or repute.
2. a high elevation; hill or height.
3. (cap.) a title of honor, applied to cardinals (usu. prec. by His or Your).
4. an anatomical projection, esp. on a bone.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Anglo-French < Latin]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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eminency

noun
A position of exalted widely recognized importance:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
This rhetoric, or power to fix the momentary eminency of an object,--so remarkable in Burke, in Byron, in Carlyle,--the painter and sculptor exhibit in color and in stone.
White, and Seabrooke and Tsingou's analysis of Andrew Haldane and Avinash Persaud show clearly that the members' eminency was essential for authorizing their activities.
the passion of laughter is nothing else but sudden glory arising from some sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others, or with our own formerly
He considered laughter as a passion, which is nothing but sudden glory arising from a sudden conception of some eminency in ourselves, by comparison with the infirmity of others (Heyd, 1982).
Locke (1690) characterizes argument from authority, ad verecundiam, as derived from persons "whose parts, learning, eminency, power, or some other cause, has gained a name, and settled their reputation" (p.