forbidder


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for·bid

 (fər-bĭd′, fôr-)
tr.v. for·bade (-băd′, -bād′) or for·bad (-băd′), for·bid·den (-bĭd′n) or for·bid, for·bid·ding, for·bids
1. To command (someone) not to do something: I forbid you to go.
2. To command against the doing or use of (something); prohibit: forbid smoking on trains.
3. To have the effect of preventing; preclude: Discretion forbids a reply.

[Middle English forbidden, forbeden, from Old English forbēodan; see bheudh- in Indo-European roots.]

for·bid′dance n.
for·bid′der n.
Synonyms: forbid, ban1, prohibit, proscribe
These verbs mean to refuse to allow: laws that forbid speeding; banned smoking in restaurants; rules that prohibit loitering; proscribed the importation of certain fruits.
Antonym: permit1
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
And I perhaps am secret; Heav'n is high, High and remote to see from thence distinct Each thing on Earth; and other care perhaps May have diverted from continual watch Our great Forbidder, safe with all his Spies About him.
687) and, after eating the fruit, Eve slanders God as a totalitarian dictator with an angelic police state, Our great Forbidder, safe with all his Spies | About him' (IX.
And I perhaps am secret; heaven is high, High and remote to see from thence distinct Each thing on earth; and other care perhaps May have diverted from continual watch Our great forbidder, safe with all his spies About him.