glasshouse


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glass·house

 (glăs′hous′)
n.
1. See glasswork.
2. Chiefly British A greenhouse.
3. A place, position, or situation involving intense public scrutiny.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

glasshouse

(ˈɡlɑːsˌhaʊs)
n
1. (Botany) Brit a glass building, esp a greenhouse, used for growing plants in protected or controlled conditions
2. (Military) obsolete informal chiefly Brit a military detention centre
3. (Ceramics) US another word for glassworks
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

glass•house

(ˈglæsˌhaʊs, ˈglɑs-)

n., pl. -hous•es (-ˌhaʊ zɪz) Brit.
2. Slang. a military prison.
[1350–1400]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.glasshouse - a building with glass walls and roofglasshouse - a building with glass walls and roof; for the cultivation and exhibition of plants under controlled conditions
building, edifice - a structure that has a roof and walls and stands more or less permanently in one place; "there was a three-story building on the corner"; "it was an imposing edifice"
hothouse, indoor garden, conservatory - a greenhouse in which plants are arranged in a pleasing manner
orangery - a place where oranges are grown; a plantation of orange trees in warm climes or a greenhouse in cooler areas
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

glasshouse

noun greenhouse, conservatory, hothouse This kind of plant needs to be grown in a glasshouse.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

glasshouse

[ˈglɑːshaʊs] N (glasshouses (pl)) [ˈglɑːshaʊzɪz] (for plants) → invernadero m (Brit) (Mil) → cárcel f (militar)
see also glass B
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

glasshouse

[ˈglɑːshaʊs] nserre f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

glasshouse

[ˈglɑːsˌhaʊs] n (for plants) → serra
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Henzill's glasshouse; and that the box was marked I.
CAMPAIGNERS fighting to save an Edwardianstyle glasshouse in Tameside from demolition say the battle isn't over - despite being told the structure 'will not remain standing'.
A DILAPIDATED Victorian glasshouse in a Glasgow park is set to receive a PS1million windfall.
Under the terms of the License, Glasshouse Botanics will pay EnWave a usage-based royalty tied to the weight of finish dried cannabis dried using the REV machine.
Arid House: A glasshouse for plants from climates with low, irregular rainfall but also for those in dry locations, such as cliffs or tree branches.
Shares of Omnicell are continuing to fall after short-seller GlassHouse Research yesterday posted a report about the company on its website.
But computerised glasshouse technology is allowing producers in Lancashire and Scotland to be among the first to deliver fruit to retailers.
A common glasshouse pest, it's a sap sucker, and you'll be able to detect it by sooty marks on your leaves - this is a mould growing on their sticky excreta.
More than 50 species of free-flying butterflies will inhabit the tropical Zone of the Glasshouse as they land on plants, fruit and even people.
The Glasshouse Tea Room will open at Northumberland Park, which is nestled between North Shields and Tynemouth, on Sunday as part of the council's multimillion pound revamp and investment work.