globe thistle

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globe thistle

n.
Any of several Eurasian plants of the genus Echinops in the composite family, having bipinnately dissected leaves with prickly margins and dense, bluish, globose flower heads.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.globe thistle - any of various plants of the genus Echinops having prickly leaves and dense globose heads of bluish flowersglobe thistle - any of various plants of the genus Echinops having prickly leaves and dense globose heads of bluish flowers
Echinops, genus Echinops - genus of Mediterranean and Eurasian herbs: globe thistles
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
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While globe thistles sometimes seed themselves around a bit, they are not nearly as aggressive as weedy thistles.
Good plants to achieve this include globe thistles, lavender, buddleia and wallflowers.
Next, you'll need some decorative materials - these could be berries, pine cones or interesting seed heads such as poppies, teasels, eryngiums and globe thistles. Dried hydrangea flowers look glamorous sprayed in gold, and this year I'm eyeing up the large spiky agapanthus heads.
Next, you will need to look for some decorative materials - these could be berries, pine cones or interesting seed heads, such as poppies, teasels, eryngiums and globe thistles.
"You can warm up a stark white room with just a single stem of Bird of Paradise, or add some drama to your decor with a bold arrangement of purple globe thistles."
Expert tip: Coneflowers combine especially well with ornamental grasses and achillea or yarrow in a natural prairiestyle planting scheme, and in flower beds with globe thistles and bee balm to attract bees and butterflies.
July is a fulsome month when many herbaceous plants are flowering profusely and the big borders at the bottom end of the garden look very fine - great drifts of the pink candyfloss of Filipendula rubra 'Venusta', spiky blue sea hollies and cottage garden Shasta daisies, the globe thistles that the bees love and many delights at different heights filling out the borders.