halophily

halophily

(hæˈlɒfɪlɪ)
n
the ability or predisposition to thrive in an extremely salty environment
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Previously, Golubic (1980) pointed at the difference between "halotolerance" and "halophily", as the distinction between halophilic ([Na.sup.+]-requiring) and halotolerant organisms is not suitable to describe the entire spectrum of adaptations to salt.
Since not all species respond to the same nutritional, macroecological or biogeographical patterns, it will be necessary to expand the study of this type of plants to a global scale before generating a consistent theory as occurs with halophily. To date, according to the cases reviewed, the inductive approach is nearly always backing the plants indicated as gypsophytes (or gypsophiles; Table 1).
It is evident that gypsophile vegetation, or rather, that with a good representation of gypsophile plants in terms of coverage and species richness, occurs in soils with a high percentages of gypsum, as happens with conductivity values to establish halophily. As soon as information on the abundance of gypsum in the soil becomes available, it may be possible to establish a minimum level of this mineral as a discriminating criterion for gypsophily.