incensed


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in·cense 1

 (ĭn-sĕns′)
tr.v. in·censed, in·cens·ing, in·cens·es
To cause to be extremely angry; infuriate.

[Middle English encensen, from Old French incenser, from Late Latin incēnsāre, to sacrifice, burn, from Latin incēnsus, past participle of incendere, to set on fire; see kand- in Indo-European roots.]

in·cense 2

 (ĭn′sĕns′)
n.
1.
a. An aromatic substance, such as wood or a gum, that is burned to produce a pleasant odor.
b. The smoke or odor produced by the burning of such a substance.
2. A pleasant smell.
tr.v. in·censed, in·cens·ing, in·cens·es
1. To perfume with incense.
2. To burn incense to (a deity, for example) as a ritual offering.

[Middle English encens, from Old French, from Latin incēnsum, from neuter past participle of incendere, to set on fire; see kand- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

incensed

(ɪnˈsɛnst)
adj
greatly enraged
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.incensed - angered at something unjust or wrongincensed - angered at something unjust or wrong; "an indignant denial"; "incensed at the judges' unfairness"; "a look of outraged disbelief"; "umbrageous at the loss of their territory"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

incensed

adjective angry, mad (informal), furious, cross, fuming, choked, pissed (Brit., Austral., & N.Z. slang), infuriated, enraged, maddened, exasperated, indignant, pissed off (taboo slang), irate, up in arms, incandescent, steamed up (slang), hot under the collar (informal), on the warpath (informal), wrathful, ireful (literary) She was incensed at his lack of compassion.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
يُغيظ، يُثير حَفيظَة
rozlobenýrozzuřený
felbõszült
verda iš pykčio
aizkaitinātssaniknots
rozčúlený
çok kızmış

incensed

[ɪnˈsenst] ADJ [person] → furioso, furibundo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

incensed

[ɪnˈsɛnst] adjrévolté(e)
to be incensed at sth → être révolté(e) par qch
to be incensed that → être révolté(e) que + subjincense stick [ˈɪnsɛnsstɪk] nbâton m d'encens
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

incensed

[ɪnˈsɛnst] adjfurente, furibondo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

incensed

(inˈsenst) adjective
extremely angry. She is incensed at the decision to cancel the project.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
At this evidence of Mongolian barbarity the White Christians were so greatly incensed that they carried out their original design.
Certainly virtue is like precious odors, most fragrant when they are incensed, or crushed: for prosperity doth best discover vice, but adversity doth best discover virtue.
"Sir Edward is greatly incensed by your abrupt departure; he has taken back Augusta to Bedfordshire.
The event of all this is very provoking: Sir James is gone, Maria highly incensed, and Mrs.
One day a woman came down to the edge of the water and was stooping to remove her attire (a pair of sandals) when the consul, incensed beyond restraint, fired a charge of bird-shot into the most conspicuous part of her person.
The prow of the boat is partially unbroken, and is drawn just balancing upon the monster's spine; and standing in that prow, for that one single incomputable flash of time, you behold an oarsman, half shrouded by the incensed boiling spout of the whale, and in the act of leaping, as if from a precipice.
If his whole life, for instance, should have been one continued subject of satire, he may well tremble when an incensed satirist takes him in hand.
Of late his mother, incensed with him on account of his love affair and his leaving Moscow, had given up sending him the money.