ingrained


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in·grained

 (ĭn-grānd′)
adj.
1. Firmly established, as by long conditioning; deep-seated: ingrained prejudice; the ingrained habits of a lifetime.
2. Worked deeply into the texture or fiber: a carpet disfigured by ingrained dirt.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ingrained

(ɪnˈɡreɪnd) or

engrained

adj
1. deeply impressed or instilled: his fears are deeply ingrained.
2. (prenominal) complete or inveterate; utter: an ingrained fool.
3. (esp of dirt) worked into or through the fibre, grain, pores, etc
ingrainedly, engrainedly adv
inˈgrainedness, enˈgrainedness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•grained

(ɪnˈgreɪnd, ˈɪnˌgreɪnd)

also engrained



adj.
1. firmly fixed; deep-rooted; inveterate: ingrained superstition.
2. wrought into or through the grain or fiber.
[1590–1600]
in•grain•ed•ly (ɪnˈgreɪ nɪd li, -ˈgreɪnd-) adv.
in•grain′ed•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ingrain, ingrained - Ingrain literally means "work into the grain" (originally, of fabric), and ingrained is metaphorically "deep-seated."
See also related terms for metaphor.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ingrained - (used especially of ideas or principles) deeply rooted; firmly fixed or held; "deep-rooted prejudice"; "deep-seated differences of opinion"; "implanted convictions"; "ingrained habits of a lifetime"; "a deeply planted need"
constituted, established - brought about or set up or accepted; especially long established; "the established social order"; "distrust the constituted authority"; "a team established as a member of a major league"; "enjoyed his prestige as an established writer"; "an established precedent"; "the established Church"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

ingrained

engrained
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

ingrained

adjective
2. Forming an essential element, as arising from the basic structure of an individual:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

ingrained

[ˈɪnˈgreɪnd] ADJ
1. [dirt, blood, stain] → incrustado
2. (fig) (= deep-seated) [attitude, ideas, habit, tradition] → arraigado
to be deeply ingrained in sbestar profundamente arraigado en algn
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

ingrained

[ɪnˈgreɪnd] adj [habit] → enraciné(e); [attitude, prejudice] → enraciné(e)
deeply ingrained → profondément enraciné(e)
deeply ingrained family loyalty → une loyauté familiale profondément enracinée
to be ingrained in sb → être enraciné(e) dans qn
to be ingrained in society → être enraciné(e) dans la société
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

ingrained

adj
(fig) habitfest, eingefleischt; prejudicetief verwurzelt or eingewurzelt; belieffest verankert, unerschütterlich; to be (deeply) ingrainedfest verwurzelt sein
dirttief eingedrungen, tief sitzend (attr); the dirt was deeply ingrained in the carpetder Schmutz hatte sich tief im Teppich festgesetzt; hands ingrained with dirtHände, bei denen sich der Schmutz in den Poren festgesetzt hat
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

ingrained

[ˈɪnˈgreɪnd] adj (dirt) → incrostato/a (fig) (ideas, tradition) → radicato/a; (habit, prejudice) → inveterato/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
Ingrained in Michael's heredity, from the very beginning of four- legged dogs on earth, was the DEFENCE OF THE MEAT.
The idea of absolute financial probity as the first law of a gentleman's code was too deeply ingrained in him for sentimental considerations to weaken it.
It was from Akut--a sudden, low growl, no louder than those he had been giving vent to the while he pranced about the dead bull, nor half so loud in fact; but of a timbre that bore straight to the perceptive faculties of the jungle beast ingrained in Korak.
She was repelled by those lacerated hands, grimed by toil so that the very dirt of life was ingrained in the flesh itself, by that red chafe of the collar and those bulging muscles.
After a year Edinburgh dropped him, thus supplying substantial fuel for his ingrained poor man's jealousy and rancor at the privileged classes.
The community instinct was ingrained in their characters through ages of custom.
The fiasco of the PTI Minister promoting her sister for an elevated role in the NACTA department highlights the ingrained bad habits in our society of nepotism or promotion of own relatives.
The Special Assistant said that the goal of Imran Khan is to find a permanent cure of the cancer that has ingrained in the system.
"Ingrained fraternity" operetta embodying deep-rooted Kuwaiti-Saudi ties KUWAIT, Feb 11 (KUNA) -- "Ingrained fraternity," an operetta embodying deep-rooted Kuwaiti-Saudi relations, was held Monday as part of "Al-Fahad..
A never-say-die attitude seems ingrained in the Far Eastern University (FEU) Tamaraws basketball team.
'It should come as no surprise to you that I have decided to leave the PTI,' read the letter thanking Imran Khan for providing her a platform to develop her political career in line with the principles of justice, merit and accountability that were previously ingrained in the party's culture.
On the one hand, the Critical Race Theorists who advocated curtailment of speech offensive to minorities insisted that individual instances of hate speech are never, as the law professor Charles Lawrence put it, "the isolated, unpopular speech of a dissident few." Rather, they were "manifestations of a ubiquitous and deeply ingrained cultural belief system, an American way of life."