intercession


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Related to intercession: intercessor

in·ter·ces·sion

 (ĭn′tər-sĕsh′ən)
n.
1. Entreaty in favor of another, especially a prayer or petition to God in behalf of another.
2. Mediation in a dispute.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin intercessiō, intercessiōn-, intervention, from intercessus, past participle of intercēdere, to intervene; see intercede.]

in′ter·ces′sion·al adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

intercession

(ˌɪntəˈsɛʃən)
n
1. the act or an instance of interceding
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the act of interceding or offering petitionary prayer to God on behalf of others
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) such petitionary prayer
4. (Historical Terms) Roman history the interposing of a veto by a tribune or other magistrate
[C16: from Latin intercessio; see intercede]
ˌinterˈcessional, ˌinterˈcessory adj
ˌinterˈcessor n
ˌintercesˈsorial adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

in•ter•ces•sion

(ˌɪn tərˈsɛʃ ən)

n.
1. an act or instance of interceding.
2. an interposing or pleading on behalf of another person.
3. a prayer to God on behalf of another.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin intercessiō=intercēd(ere) to intercede + -tiō -tion]
in`ter•ces′sion•al, adj.
in`ter•ces′so•ry, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.intercession - a prayer to God on behalf of another personintercession - a prayer to God on behalf of another person
orison, petition, prayer - reverent petition to a deity
2.intercession - the act of intervening (as to mediate a dispute, etc.); "it occurs without human intervention"
involvement, participation, involution, engagement - the act of sharing in the activities of a group; "the teacher tried to increase his students' engagement in class activities"
intermediation, mediation - the act of intervening for the purpose of bringing about a settlement
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

intercession

noun pleading, prayer, intervention, plea, mediation, advocacy, solicitation, entreaty, good offices, supplication Many claimed to have been cured as a result of her intercessions.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
وِساطَه، شَفاعَه
přímluva
forbøn
közbenjárás
meîalganga
intervencia
aracılık etmeşefaat

intercession

[ˌɪntəˈseʃən] Nintercesión f, mediación f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

intercession

[ˌɪntərˈsɛʃən] nintercession f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

intercession

nFürsprache f; (in argument) → Vermittlung f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

intercession

[ˌɪntəˈsɛʃn] nintercessione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

intercede

(intəˈsiːd) verb
1. to try to put an end to a fight, argument etc between two people, countries etc. All attempts to intercede between the two nations failed.
2. to try to persuade someone not to do something to someone else. The condemned murderer's family interceded (with the President) on his behalf.
ˌinterˈcession (-ˈseʃən) noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Then imagining that, if he embraced the Catholic faith, the intercession of the missionaries, with the entreaties of his wife and children, might procure him a pardon, he desired a Jesuit to hear his confession, and abjured his errors.
'I'm not going to defile my fingers with him,' said I, in answer to the maternal intercession. 'I wouldn't touch him with the tongs.'
Considering the relative ages of the two ladies, the aunt's chance, in the ordinary course of nature, of receiving the ten thousand pounds, was thus rendered doubtful in the extreme; and Madame Fosco resented her brother's treatment of her as unjustly as usual in such cases, by refusing to see her niece, and declining to believe that Miss Fairlie's intercession had ever been exerted to restore her name to Mr.
For seven years afterwards he remained, at the strong intercession of his friends, comparatively quiet; saving that he, every now and then, took occasion to display his zeal for the Protestant faith in some extravagant proceeding which was the delight of its enemies; and saving, besides, that he was formally excommunicated by the Archbishop of Canterbury, for refusing to appear as a witness in the Ecclesiastical Court when cited for that purpose.
On Noureddin's return Khacan pretended to be about to slay him, but yielding to his wife's intercession, said to his son:
Kasatsky entered the monastery on the feast of the Intercession of the Blessed Virgin.
But this intercession seemed to rekindle the general.
And further, through the gracious intercession of Her Majesty, Queen Eleanor, we do offer you full pardon for all your past crimes-
Isabel, at Miss Pink's intercession, was induced to accept her lover's excuses, and, in the event of her favorable reception by Hardyman's parents at the farm, to give her consent (not very willingly even yet) to hastening the ceremony which was to make her Hardyman's wife.
My one last hope of success in attaining this object lay in approaching her indirectly through the intercession of her father.
I had by many letters and much importunity, and with the intercession of my mother too, had a second return of some goods from my brother (as I now call him) in Virginia, to make up the damage of the cargo I brought away with me, and this too was upon the condition of my sealing a general release to him, and to send it him by his correspondent at Bristol, which, though I thought hard of, yet I was obliged to promise to do.
At his intercession, and through his influence, Frank, Cecil, and Arthur were received on the foundation of a well-reputed grammar-school.