References in classic literature ?
Philip had found the brother's address only by reading the letter in which he refused a loan; but he shrugged his shoulders: there was no use in recrimination.
"Ahem!" said the Wizard, "will somebody please loan me a handkerchief?"
"You are entirely and wholeheartedly welcome to the loan of any book on them."
He had worked on Bill's feelings so successfully as to elicit a loan of a million dollars, and was just proceeding to marry him to Elizabeth, when the cab stopped with the sudden sharpness peculiar to New York cabs, and he woke up, to find himself at his destination.
'Instead of taking it, he politely places his winnings in her hand, and begs her to accept the loan as a favour to himself.
Having got the money, how, in the present state of his trade, was the loan to be paid back?
He had not shown the slightest sign of attempting to fix anything that I had said to him in his mind, until I mentioned the time at which it was customary to permit the earliest repayment, on the part of a debtor, of money that had been advanced as a loan. When I gave him that piece of information, he looked me straight in the face, while I was speaking, for the first time.
A TRULY Pious Person who conducted a savings bank and lent money to his sisters and his cousins and his aunts of both sexes, was approached by a Tatterdemalion, who applied for a loan of one hundred thousand dollars.
'Remember, Paul, that promised Loan!' Said Paul' I'll lend you, when I can, All the spare money I have got-- Ah, Peter, you're a happy man!
Though it is not always the case, I believe, That the longer we've kept 'em, the more do we grieve: For, when debts are payable, right or wrong, A short-time loan is as bad as a long So why in Heaven (before we are there!) Should we give our hearts to a dog to tear?
And on the second month I paid him five dollars more, and continued so to do each month until I made a ten strike with the editors and lifted the loan.
As one will, with one's most serious experiences, hastening to laugh lest one should weep, as the old philosopher said, I had made some fun out of my quest, in the form of a paper for a bookish society to which I belonged, on "Woman as a Learned Pursuit." It is printed among the transactions of the society, and is accessible to the curious only by loan from the members, and I regret that I am unable to print any extracts here.