object ball

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object ball

n.
1. The ball in billiards or pool that a player hits or intends to hit first with the cue ball.
2. Any ball in billiards or pool that can be targeted by the cue ball following the rules of a given game.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

object ball

n
(Billiards & Snooker) billiards snooker any ball except the cue ball, esp one which the striker aims to hit with the cue ball
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ob′ject ball`


n.
1. the first ball struck by the cue ball in making a carom in billiards or pool.
2. a ball to be struck by the cue ball; any ball except the cue ball.
[1855–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

object ball

Ball aimed at.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.object ball - the billiard ball that is intended to be the first ball struck by the cue ballobject ball - the billiard ball that is intended to be the first ball struck by the cue ball
billiard ball - ball used in playing billiards
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This was in the days of the now-outlawed 'cradle cannon' whereby a player could push the two object balls around the table all day by making a cannon each time.
Eight-ball is played on a rectangular pool table with six pockets that is initially racked with 15 object balls (7 solids, 7 stripes, and one 8-ball), and a cue ball (see figure 2).
Players retain their turn as long as they call (in advance) an object ball of their side and a pocket, and proceed to legally sink the called ball into the called pocket.
Mabry found that the difficulty of the combo shot depends on the separation of the object balls. Large distances amplify the shooter's original error and make combo shots more difficult that single ball shots.
It is ironed regularly in one direction, from the baulk end to the top of the table creating the 'nap', which can affect the direction the cue ball and object balls run.
And beginners can make use of virtual guidelines on the baize that predict the paths of both the cue and object balls.
This was in the days of the nowoutlawed 'cradle cannon' whereby a player could push the two object balls around the table all day by making a cannon each time.