dame

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dame

 (dām)
n.
1. Used formerly as a courtesy title for a woman in authority or a mistress of a household.
2.
a. A married woman; a matron.
b. An elderly woman.
3. Often Offensive Slang A woman.
4. Chiefly British
a. A woman holding a nonhereditary title conferred by a sovereign in recognition of personal merit or service to the country.
b. The wife or widow of a knight.
c. Used as the title for such a woman.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin domina, feminine of dominus, lord, master; see dem- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dame

(deɪm)
n
1. (Sociology) (formerly) a woman of rank or dignity; lady
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a nun who has taken the vows of her order, esp a Benedictine
3. archaic chiefly Brit a matronly or elderly woman
4. slang chiefly US and Canadian a woman
5. (Theatre) Also called: pantomime dame Brit the role of a comic old woman in a pantomime, usually played by a man
[C13: from Old French, from Latin domina lady, mistress of a household]

Dame

(in Britain) n
1. (Sociology) the title of a woman who has been awarded the Order of the British Empire or any of certain other orders of chivalry
2. (Sociology) the legal title of the wife or widow of a knight or baronet, placed before her name: Dame Judith. Compare Lady
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dame

(deɪm)

n.
1. (cap.) (in Britain)
a. the official title of a female member of the Order of the British Empire, equivalent to that of a knight.
b. the official title of the wife of a knight or baronet.
2. (formerly) a form of address to any woman of rank or authority.
3. a matronly woman of advanced age; matron.
4. Slang: Sometimes Offensive. a woman; female.
5. Archaic. the mistress of a household.
6. Archaic. a woman of rank or authority, esp. a female ruler.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Old French < Latin domina, feminine of dominus lord, master]
usage: Definition 4 is sometimes perceived as insulting. The context in which the word is used will usually clarify the intent of the speaker.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.dame - informal terms for a (young) womandame - informal terms for a (young) woman  
fille, girl, miss, missy, young lady, young woman - a young woman; "a young lady of 18"
2.dame - a woman of refinementdame - a woman of refinement; "a chauffeur opened the door of the limousine for the grand lady"
grande dame - a middle-aged or elderly woman who is stylish and highly respected
madame - title used for a married Frenchwoman
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

dame

noun
1. lady, baroness, dowager, grande dame (French), noblewoman, peeress a Dame of the British Empire
2. (Slang, chiefly U.S. and Canad.) woman, girl, lady, female, bird (slang), maiden (archaic), miss, chick (slang), maid (archaic), gal (slang), lass, lassie (informal), wench (facetious) This is one classy dame you've got yourself here.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
سَيِّدهسَيِّدَه شَريفَه
dámaženská
damekvinde
damamujertía (informal)
női lovagi rang
hefîarkonakona
bobadamamoteris
dāmakundzītesievišķis
kadınkadın şövalye

dame

[deɪm] N
1. Dame (Brit) (= title) título aristocrático para mujeres equivalente a "sir"
2. (esp Brit) (o.f.) → dama f, señora f (Brit) (Theat) personaje de mujer anciana en las pantomimas británicas interpretado por un actor PANTOMIME
3. (US) (o.f.) (= woman) → tía f, gachí f (Sp)
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

dame

[ˈdeɪm] n
(US) (= woman) → nana f
(THEATRE) (also pantomime dame) → vieille dame f (rôle comique joué par un homme)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

dame

n
Dame (Brit) Titel der weiblichen Träger des „Order of the British Empire“
(= old lady)Dame f; Dame Fortune (esp Brit) → Frau Fortuna f
(Theat, in pantomime) → (komische) Alte
(US inf) → Weib nt (inf)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

dame

[deɪm] n (title, also) (Am) (fam) → donna, madama; (in pantomime) personaggio comico di donna attempata recitato da un uomo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

dame

(deim) noun
1. (the status of) a lady of the same rank as a knight. There were several dames at the royal wedding.
2. (American) a woman.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
From pantomime dames, big names and even a pig - we've had them all in South Wales.
Why don't they stay at home?" Actor Christopher Biggins, the doyen of pantomime dames.
In the past she has put up pantomime dames, handsome princes and even fairy tale princesses while they do their stint in Middlesbrough Theatre's Christmas shows.
The only advantage I can see to them being on the payroll is it would pay for a stylist who'd hopefully stop them looking like pantomime dames every time they appear in public.
Then there's pantomime dames, silly songs and of course, a happy ending.
He frequently returned to Scotland to appear in pantomime, often as a double act with his friend Stanley Baxter, their partnership as pantomime dames becoming part of the legend of Scottish theatre.
MY friend Philip Meeks, pictured, is one of the best pantomime dames in the business.
THE PHOTOGRAPHS OF pantomime dames (in red birettas) illustrating Jodi Enda's informative but depressing article (Vol.
Speakers have previously covered topics from Batman's enemies to pantomime dames, and from the Scouting movement to design in the kitchen.
Five gold rings is the inspiration for a gut-busting breakfast fit for the construction workers toiling on the Olympic site, while six geese a-laying sees them as pantomime dames.
The actor, best known for playing pantomime dames, said he was concerned about having to eat lots of rice because it gives him wind.
"He was one of the best and finest pantomime dames working to capacity audiences throughout Britain.