pasquinade

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pas·qui·nade

 (păs′kwə-nād′)
n.
A satire or lampoon, especially one that ridicules a specific person, traditionally written and posted in a public place.
tr.v. pas·qui·nad·ed, pas·qui·nad·ing, pas·qui·nades
To ridicule with a pasquinade; satirize or lampoon.

[French, from Italian pasquinata, after Pasquino, , nickname given to a statue in Rome, Italy, on which lampoons were posted.]

pas′qui·nad′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

pasquinade

(ˌpæskwɪˈneɪd) or

pasquil

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an abusive lampoon or satire, esp one posted in a public place
vb, -ades, -ading, -aded, -quils, -quilling or -quilled
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (tr) to ridicule with pasquinade
[C17: from Italian Pasquino name given to an ancient Roman statue disinterred in 1501, which was annually posted with satirical verses]
ˌpasquinˈader n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pas•quin•ade

(ˌpæs kwəˈneɪd)

n., v. -ad•ed, -ad•ing. n.
1. a satire or lampoon, esp. one posted in a public place.
v.t.
2. to satirize in a pasquinade.
[1585–95; Pasquin < Italian Pasquino, name given an antique Roman statue unearthed in 1501 that was annually decorated and posted with verses); replacing pasquinata < Italian]
pas`quin•ad′er, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pasquinade


Past participle: pasquinaded
Gerund: pasquinading

Imperative
pasquinade
pasquinade
Present
I pasquinade
you pasquinade
he/she/it pasquinades
we pasquinade
you pasquinade
they pasquinade
Preterite
I pasquinaded
you pasquinaded
he/she/it pasquinaded
we pasquinaded
you pasquinaded
they pasquinaded
Present Continuous
I am pasquinading
you are pasquinading
he/she/it is pasquinading
we are pasquinading
you are pasquinading
they are pasquinading
Present Perfect
I have pasquinaded
you have pasquinaded
he/she/it has pasquinaded
we have pasquinaded
you have pasquinaded
they have pasquinaded
Past Continuous
I was pasquinading
you were pasquinading
he/she/it was pasquinading
we were pasquinading
you were pasquinading
they were pasquinading
Past Perfect
I had pasquinaded
you had pasquinaded
he/she/it had pasquinaded
we had pasquinaded
you had pasquinaded
they had pasquinaded
Future
I will pasquinade
you will pasquinade
he/she/it will pasquinade
we will pasquinade
you will pasquinade
they will pasquinade
Future Perfect
I will have pasquinaded
you will have pasquinaded
he/she/it will have pasquinaded
we will have pasquinaded
you will have pasquinaded
they will have pasquinaded
Future Continuous
I will be pasquinading
you will be pasquinading
he/she/it will be pasquinading
we will be pasquinading
you will be pasquinading
they will be pasquinading
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been pasquinading
you have been pasquinading
he/she/it has been pasquinading
we have been pasquinading
you have been pasquinading
they have been pasquinading
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been pasquinading
you will have been pasquinading
he/she/it will have been pasquinading
we will have been pasquinading
you will have been pasquinading
they will have been pasquinading
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been pasquinading
you had been pasquinading
he/she/it had been pasquinading
we had been pasquinading
you had been pasquinading
they had been pasquinading
Conditional
I would pasquinade
you would pasquinade
he/she/it would pasquinade
we would pasquinade
you would pasquinade
they would pasquinade
Past Conditional
I would have pasquinaded
you would have pasquinaded
he/she/it would have pasquinaded
we would have pasquinaded
you would have pasquinaded
they would have pasquinaded
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.pasquinade - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous waypasquinade - a composition that imitates or misrepresents somebody's style, usually in a humorous way
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Joanna Norman analyzes the Catholic Church's effort to improve the Eternal City by perfecting Piazza del Popolo with the obelisk and Piazza Navona as a center for lavish parades, pasquinades, performances, and other public ceremonies (the Pamphili's "colonization" of space).
In some instances, contributors have revisited the writings of very well-known figures, while in other cases they have shed light on lesser-known writers as well as anonymous pronouncements such as the Pasquinades, private testimonials such as the personal letters of World War I soldiers, and choral voices such as the protest songs of female rice-workers, the mondine.
The comedies discussed here are works that are highly self-referential; the deeds and successes of Aretino recalled for his audience include the notorious Pasquinades and the statue of Pasquino in Rome with which they were associated.
The often-hostile reception of Urban VIII was exemplified in the Pasquinades and propaganda against him despite his great patronage of the arts and in part because of his nepotism and much-criticized conduct in the Thirty Years War (1618-1648).
Especially innovative are the chapters, "The City," on the transmission of information in Venice, and "Communicative Transactions," which compares different forms of communication, from official publications to the political gossip in barbershops and pharmacies and the posting of anonymous pasquinades.
and the other a statement from Crocker's New Whig Guide: 'Political Pasquinades and Political Caricatures are parts (though humble ones) of Political history.
Now that Italian society has become increasingly secularised, and the power of the church has ostensibly decreased, contemporary pasquinades do not, in general, lampoon the Vatican.
Later identified as Menelaus with the Body of Patroclus, this was probably unearthed midway through the fifteenth century; it acquired the name Pasquino early in the sixteenth when Roman citizens began literally attaching satiric verses or "pasquinades" to it.
The literal "blissful obliteration" in marriage on Purilia is the culmination of Rice's witty pasquinades upon Hollywood's simultaneous representation and suppression of human sexuality (the Purilians have no genitals).
The pasquinades characteristic satirical verses displayed on the ancient statue in Rome called `Pasquino') marking Leo's death in 1521 gave particular attention to his love of music, not as a praiseworthy characteristic but as a stick with which to beat him; one had the burden, `Mourn, musicians of Rome!
After the 16th century the vogue of posting pasquinades died out, and the term acquired its more general meaning.