pelvic floor


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pelvic floor

n
(Anatomy) the muscular area in the lower part of the abdomen, attached to the pelvis
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"Tense pelvic floor muscles do not stretch as easily, and this can cause pain," says Vincent.
(NASDAQ: GTXI) has provided additional results from a Phase 2 proof-of-concept clinical trial of 3 mg enobosarm, a selective androgen receptor modulator, administered orally in postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI), including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results from patients' pelvic floor muscle, the company said.
We've been hearing for years now about the importance of doing pelvic floor exercises (aka: Kegel excercises), but many of us still have questions.
Commencing pelvic floor muscle (PFM) exercises preoperatively can improve post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence (PPI) (Chang, Lam, & Patel, 2016; Dorey, 2005; Fernandez et al., 2015; MacDonald, Fink, Huckabay, Monga, & Wilt, 2007; Moul, 1994; Nahon, Waddington, Dorey, & Adams, 2009; Overgard, Angelsen, Lydersen, & Morkved, 2008; Parekh et al., 2003; Tienforti et al., 2012; Xie & Sandhu, 2013).
Studies show 73% of women who do three sets of eight to 12 decent pelvic floor squeezes two to four days a week for five months are totally cured, while 97% show some improvement.
One woman leading from the front is fitness instructor Fiona Carter, who is out to change the way women deal with pelvic floor health.
If you have pain in your lower abdominal area or are challenged by incontinence issues that prevent you from living a complete life, you may be suffering from a pelvic floor disorder (PFD).
HALF OF WOMEN OVER 50 HAVE SOME DEGREE OF PROLAPSE A PROLAPSE happens when weakened pelvic floor muscles and weakened vaginal wall lead to one or more of the pelvic organs, often the bladder, bulging into the vagina.
Now continence specialist Jane Simpson has written a book aptly titled The Pelvic Floor Bible in which she breaks the taboo on discussing things like stress incontinence which affects one in three women.
IF you wet yourself a little when you laugh, cough or sneeze, you might be among the one in three women (and many older men) with a weak pelvic floor.