phototransistor

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pho·to·tran·sis·tor

 (fō′tō-trăn-zĭs′tər)
n.
A transistor that regulates current based not on an electrical signal but on the intensity of light hitting its photosensitive base.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

phototransistor

(ˌfəʊtəʊtrænˈzɪstə)
n
(Electronics) a junction transistor, whose base signal is generated by illumination of the base. The emitter current, and hence collector current, increases with the intensity of the light
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
As the phototransistors produce higher current than the photodiodes, they are preferred for many applications.
Summary: As the phototransistors produce higher current than the photodiodes, they are preferred for many applications.
Ashour, "Performance Evaluation of Phototransistors and their Behavior under Gamma Radiation Effects," in Proceedings of the EG0800227 The Second All African IRPA Regional Radiation Protection Congress, Ismailia, Egypt, 2007.
There are several types of light sensors including photoresistors, photodiodes, and phototransistors. These light sensors distinguish the substance of light in a growth chamber and increase or decrease the brightness of light to a more comfortable level.
Konstantatos, "Photo-FETs: Phototransistors Enabled by 2D and 0D Nanomaterials," ACS Photonics, vol.
Yang, "Plasmonic silicon quantum dots enabled high-sensitivity ultrabroadband photodetection of graphene-based hybrid phototransistors," ACS Nano, Vol.
To alter optical signals to electrical signals and to exploit optical radiation [4] photoconductors, phototransistors, laser diodes, photodiodes, electrooptic modulators, and other components are frequently employed in optoelectronic telecommunications systems.
Zhenqiang "Jack" Ma and Jung-Hun Seo, who were the two developers of the fast-performing piece and electrical engineering experts with the UW-Madison, said that their phototransistor tops other silicon phototransistors on the market in both response time and photosensitivity.
Phototransistors, used in CD players, are an example of such devices that hold much promise.
For more information about Fairchild, FODM8801x, the OptoHiT Series, Phototransistors, Optocouplers, and SMT Single Channel, as well as access to the world's largest available-to-sell inventory, visit www.FutureElectronics.com.