political intelligence

political intelligence

Intelligence concerning foreign and domestic policies of governments and the activities of political movements.
Dictionary of Military and Associated Terms. US Department of Defense 2005.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
They also announced responsibility for the attack on a minibus carrying staff from the political security organization in the capital Sana'a last month in which one political intelligence officer was killed and others were injured, according to the interior ministry.
During an interactive session, David Bancroft-Turner, Managing Director at the Academy for Political Intelligence, emphasised the importance of becoming familiar with one's own company politics in order to excel as a professional.
A source said: "The security services are as interested in political intelligence as they are about any IRA gossip.
He unleashed some nostalgic political intelligence with The Style Council classic Shout To The Top, a bold song aimed directly at the miners' strike of the 1980s.
If there is an orthodoxy that can't be questioned, the collection of political intelligence from these sources is going to be pretty useless.
Goldstein explains all of these differences in detail, but his main focus is on the work of the Foreign Office's Political Intelligence Department, which was designed to coordinate the diverse planning activities.
On the contrary, the way the opposition currently operates makes any party which wants to intervene hesitant, unsure of how effective their help might be to a movement that lacks unity, clarity of vision and political intelligence, key components of any effective opposition.
But even Bob Barr, the former GOP congressman from Georgia and current Libertarian nominee for president, is saying that John McCain is "toast," according to Foon Rhee of the Globe's "Political Intelligence." Barr has said that McCain is on his "farewell tour" across America because he has no realistic chance of winning the presidential election.
"It is that all paramilitary groups cease to act as armies or militias, as police forces, political intelligence services or as crime gangs.
Carruth is an unacknowledged titan of contemporary letters: The quirky and unique historical and political intelligence at work here, along with a deceptively effortless-seeming prosodic virtuosity and Carruth's perfect pitch for a certain American idiom, make this book a continuing relevation.