protend

protend

(prəʊˈtɛnd)
vb
1. (tr) to stretch forth
2. (intr) to protrude
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Her background experiential horizon does not include the notion of the watch as a whole, thus it would be impossible for her to protend or experience the spring to be a part.
Although firmly rooted in the body, the affect protends to its virtual becoming.
(41) The diachronic function in this story asserts itself as dominant through the progressive movement of tenses from past ("called"), to contemporaneous present ("is running"), to a present that protends the future ("go [on]").
(13) Admitting the awkwardness of this term, I prefer it in this context due to its resonances of "instant" insofar as it is read to mark a temporal modality that becomes enlivened through an active contraction of the past, and the protended future, into an instant pregnant with the potentialities brought forth through the force of seriality.
It is reminiscent of Sonia's increasingly skeletal form that is highlighted in a bathing scene in which Vittorio runs his fingers over her body which slumps forward, almost playing her protended spine like a rasp.
Coleridge figures his soul as "a blind man," a writer who must see through his own hieroglyphic, "with his protended Staff dimly thro' the medium of the [begin strike through]act[end strike through] instrument by which it pushes off, & in the act of repulsion" (N 3215).
Furthermore, choices within the campus environment such as which college or program protends the type of curriculum and learning environment that in turn is believed to effect the transitions for Asian students within the collegiate experience.