readdict

readdict

(ˌriːəˈdɪkt)
vb (tr)
to cause (a person) to become addicted to something again
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Song, "Acupuncture at Baihui and Dazhui reduces brain cell apoptosis in heroin readdicts," Neural Regeneration Research, vol.
Upon inspection, the following reasons for relapse were chosen most often: boredom; wanting to use and get high; anger; feeling anxious or stressed; having too much money; believing use could occur without getting readdicted; stopping meeting attendance; and relationship problems or break-up.
Upon inspection, the following reasons for relapse were chosen most often: feeling anxious or stressed; feeling depressed; feeling lonely; boredom; relationship problems or break-up; wanting to use and get high; the pain of withdrawal; and believing that use could occur without getting readdicted. The reasons least chosen were the following: trying a drug different from their drug of choice; feeling tired; pay day; and wanting to celebrate because things were going well.
In particular, for both men and women, reasons for relapse that were identified as being very prevalent were feeling bored, feeling anxious or stressed, wanting to use and get high, believing that use could occur without getting readdicted, and relationship problems or break-up.
It appears that clients do not ask or say to themselves "I wonder if I can use without getting readdicted? I want to test myself!" Rather, they say something more like the following: "I can use without getting readdicted as this time I will control it." At the time, rather than wondering if they can control drug use, they completely believe they can use in safety.
I've worked with men readdicted in their 60s who have been in and out of addiction treatment for 40 years or more.
At seven to 10 months post-release, none of the 12 became readdicted, although 10 had used heroin and three had been reincarcerated.
Only one in eight became readdicted at any time during the three years after they came home.
at 32 (stating that two-thirds of the patients became readdicted to drugs within six months after discharge and only 13% avoided use of opiates during that same period).
Half the veterans addicted in Vietnam had used heroin since their return home, but only 12 percent of those became readdicted.