revered


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re·vere 1

 (rĭ-vîr′)
tr.v. re·vered, re·ver·ing, re·veres
To regard with awe, deference, and devotion.

[French révérer, from Old French reverer, from Latin reverērī : re-, re- + verērī, to respect; see wer- in Indo-European roots.]
Synonyms: revere1, worship, venerate, adore, idolize
These verbs mean to regard with deep respect, deference, and admiration. Revere suggests awe coupled with profound honor: "At least one third of the population ... reveres every sort of holy man" (Rudyard Kipling).
Worship connotes an often uncritical devotion: "[The shortstop] was universally worshipped by fans from the first day he came to Boston" (Dan Shaughnessy).
Venerate connotes reverence accorded by virtue especially of dignity or age: "I venerate the memory of my grandfather" (Horace Walpole).
To adore is to worship with deep, often rapturous love: The students adored their caring teacher. Idolize implies regard like that accorded an object of religious devotion: a general who was idolized by his troops.

re·vere 2

 (rĭ-vîr′, -vâr′)
n.
Variant of revers.

revered

(rɪˈvɪəd)
adj
respected, venerated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.revered - profoundly honoredrevered - profoundly honored; "revered holy men"
honourable, honorable - worthy of being honored; entitled to honor and respect; "an honorable man"; "led an honorable life"; "honorable service to his country"
Translations

revered

[rɪˈvɪərd] adjvénéré(e)
References in classic literature ?
Now, as always, Clare's father was sanguine as a child; and though the younger could not accept his parent's narrow dogma he revered his practice, and recognized the hero under the pietist.
Besides, the journey is nowadays much more usual, and therefore much less adventurous, than when those revered writers first described it.
I obediently despised the classic unities and the French and Italian theatre which had perpetuated them, and I revered the romantic drama which had its glorious course among the Spanish and English poets, and which was crowned with the fame of the Cervantes and the Shakespeare whom I seemed to own, they owned me so completely.
With thee have I broken up whatever my heart revered; all boundary-stones and statues have I o'erthrown; the most dangerous wishes did I pursue,-- verily, beyond every crime did I once go.
A home without a cat--and a well-fed, well-petted, and properly revered cat-- may be a perfect home, perhaps, but how can it prove title?
Her husband's suffering and dangers, and the danger of her child, all blended in her mind, with a confused and stunning sense of the risk she was running, in leaving the only home she had ever known, and cutting loose from the protection of a friend whom she loved and revered. Then there was the parting from every familiar object,--the place where she had grown up, the trees under which she had played, the groves where she had walked many an evening in happier days, by the side of her young husband,--everything, as it lay in the clear, frosty starlight, seemed to speak reproachfully to her, and ask her whither could she go from a home like that?
Lucy was standing flowerlike by the water, he rushed up and took her in his arms; she rebuked him, permitted him and revered him ever after for his manliness.
I revered our theology, and aspired as much as any one to reach heaven: but being given assuredly to understand that the way is not less open to the most ignorant than to the most learned, and that the revealed truths which lead to heaven are above our comprehension, I did not presume to subject them to the impotency of my reason; and I thought that in order competently to undertake their examination, there was need of some special help from heaven, and of being more than man.
Therefore, he who considers it necessary to secure himself in his new principality, to win friends, to overcome either by force or fraud, to make himself beloved and feared by the people, to be followed and revered by the soldiers, to exterminate those who have power or reason to hurt him, to change the old order of things for new, to be severe and gracious, magnanimous and liberal, to destroy a disloyal soldiery and to create new, to maintain friendship with kings and princes in such a way that they must help him with zeal and offend with caution, cannot find a more lively example than the actions of this man.