saggy


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sag

 (săg)
v. sagged, sag·ging, sags
v.intr.
1. To sink, droop, or settle from pressure or weight.
2. To lose vigor, firmness, or resilience: My spirits sagged after I had been rejected for the job.
3. To decline, as in value or price: Stock prices sagged after a short rally.
4. Nautical To drift to leeward.
5. To wear one's pants with the waist below the hips, so that one's underwear is visible.
v.tr.
To cause to sag.
n.
1.
a. The act or an instance of sagging.
b. The degree or extent to which something sags.
2.
a. A sagging or drooping part or area: tried to brush out the paint sags.
b. A sunken area of land; a depression.
3. A sagging area; a depression.
4. A decline, as in monetary value.
5. Nautical A drift to leeward.

[Middle English saggen, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish sacka, to sink.]

sag′gy adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

saggy

(ˈsæɡɪ)
adj, -gier or -giest
1. sinking in parts, as under or as a result of weight or pressure
2. hanging unevenly; drooping; not firm
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sag•gy

(ˈsæg i)

adj. -gi•er, -gi•est.
tending to sag.
[1850–1855]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

saggy

[ˈsægɪ] ADJ [mattress, sofa,] → deformado, hundido; [garment] → deformado, dado de sí, colgón; [bottom, breasts] → colgón, caído
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

saggy

[ˈsægi] adj [mattress, chair] → affaissé(e); [body, flesh] → mou(molle)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

saggy

(+er)
adj mattressdurchgelegen; sofadurchgesessen; garmentausgebeult; bottom, breastsschlaff; if my breasts got saggywenn ich einen Hängebusen bekäme; saggy breasts/cheeksHängebusen m/-backen pl
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
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Saggy pants is an issue that is addressed not just in ordinances and bylaws, but school dress codes and job training programs.