salvia

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sal·vi·a

 (săl′vē-ə)
n.
1. Any of various plants of the genus Salvia of the mint family, having opposite leaves, a two-lipped corolla, and two stamens.
2. A preparation made from the dried or crushed leaves of Salvia divinorum, or from an extract of the leaves, usually smoked, chewed, or ingested to produce a hallucinatory effect.

[Latin salvia, sage; see sage2.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

salvia

(ˈsælvɪə)
n
(Plants) any herbaceous plant or small shrub of the genus Salvia, such as the sage, grown for their medicinal or culinary properties or for ornament: family Lamiaceae (labiates)
[C19: from Latin: sage2]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sal•vi•a

(ˈsæl vi ə)

n., pl. -vi•as.
any of various plants of the genus Salvia, of the mint family, that have opposite leaves and whorled flowers, esp. the red-flowered S. splendens.
[1835–45; < New Latin, Latin: sage]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.salvia - any of various plants of the genus Salviasalvia - any of various plants of the genus Salvia; a cosmopolitan herb
herb, herbaceous plant - a plant lacking a permanent woody stem; many are flowering garden plants or potherbs; some having medicinal properties; some are pests
genus Salvia - large genus of shrubs and subshrubs of the mint family varying greatly in habit: sage
Salvia azurea, blue sage - blue-flowered sage of dry prairies of the eastern United States
clary sage, Salvia clarea - stout Mediterranean sage with white or pink or violet flowers; yields oil used as a flavoring and in perfumery
mealy sage, Salvia farinacea, blue sage - Texas sage having intensely blue flowers
blue sage, Salvia lancifolia, Salvia reflexa - sage of western North America to Central America having violet-blue flowers; widespread in cultivation
chaparral sage, purple sage, Salvia leucophylla - silvery-leaved California herb with purple flowers
cancer weed, cancerweed, Salvia lyrata - sage of eastern United States
common sage, ramona, Salvia officinalis - shrubby plant with aromatic greyish-green leaves used as a cooking herb
meadow clary, Salvia pratensis - tall perennial Old World salvia with violet-blue flowers; found in open grasslands
clary, Salvia sclarea - aromatic herb of southern Europe; cultivated in Great Britain as a potherb and widely as an ornamental
pitcher sage, Salvia spathacea - California erect and sparsely branched perennial
Mexican mint, Salvia divinorum - an herb from Oaxaca that has a powerful hallucinogenic effect; the active ingredient is salvinorin
Salvia verbenaca, vervain sage, wild clary, wild sage - Eurasian sage with blue flowers and foliage like verbena; naturalized in United States
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

salvia

[ˈsælvɪə] Nsalvia f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
FOR previous generations, salvias took their place among the plethora of bedding plants which would brighten borders, planted in rows, often beside silvery cineraria.
Salvias can be propagated by seed, but the results are variable, so, if you want your favourite cultivar to come true, you need to take cuttings which you can do now, though earlier in the summer is the optimum time.
Garden sage can be used in cooking Nachtvlinder - for its small velvety purple flowers The popular Hot Lips, a bicolour of white and red, which has been joined this year by a new cultivar, Amethyst Lips, which is purple and white Salvia discolor - whose flowers appear almost black, contrasting with the white OR previous generations, salvias took their place among the plethora of bedding plants which would brighten borders, planted in rows, often beside silvery cineraria.
Garden sage can be used in cooking Lavish: Salvia 'Mainacht' turned Diarmuid's head Credit: crocus.co.uk Display: Salvias at the Great Comp Garden
Lavish: Salvia 'Mainacht' turned Diarmuid's head Credit: crocus.co.uk OR previous generations, salvias took their place among the plethora of bedding plants which would brighten borders, planted in rows, often beside silvery cineraria.
| Tender plants like salvias need to be dug up, potted and put in a frost-free conservatory for the winter.
Then during the summer and towards the arrival of autumn, gather your semiripe cuttings of penstemon, salvias and marguerites.
Salvias have had a good year all round but what better way to bring it to a grand finale than with this plant.
The California salvias. A review of Salvia, section Audibertia.
Salvias are long flowering, with the potential to put on a great show through much of the summer and into autumn.