say-so


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

say-so

(sā′sō′)
n. pl. say-sos Informal
1. An unsupported statement or assurance: I'm not reporting him just on your say-so.
2. An expression of permission or approval: If you want to borrow the bike, you have to get her say-so.
3. The right or authority to decide: Do I have any say-so in this matter?
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

say-so

n
1. an arbitrary assertion
2. an authoritative decision
3. the authority to make a final decision
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

say′-so`



n., pl. say-sos.
1. one's personal statement or assertion.
2. right of final authority.
3. an authoritative statement.
[1630–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.say-so - one chap's arbitrary assertion
affirmation, assertion, statement - the act of affirming or asserting or stating something
2.say-so - an authoritative declarationsay-so - an authoritative declaration  
declaration - a statement that is emphatic and explicit (spoken or written)
directive - a pronouncement encouraging or banning some activity; "the boss loves to send us directives"
3.say-so - the power or right to give orders or make decisionssay-so - the power or right to give orders or make decisions; "he has the authority to issue warrants"; "deputies are given authorization to make arrests"; "a place of potency in the state"
power of appointment - authority given (in a will or deed) by a donor to a donee to appoint the beneficiaries of the donor's property
control - power to direct or determine; "under control"
carte blanche - complete freedom or authority to act
command - the power or authority to command; "an admiral in command"
imperium - supreme authority; absolute dominion
lordship - the authority of a lord
muscle - authority or power or force (especially when used in a coercive way); "the senators used their muscle to get the party leader to resign"
sovereignty - the authority of a state to govern another state
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

say-so

noun (Informal) assertion, authority, agreement, word, guarantee, sanction, permission, consent, assurance, assent, authorization, dictum, asseveration, O.K. or okay (informal) Nothing happens without their say-so.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

say-so

noun
1. Informal. The right and power to command, decide, rule, or judge:
2. Informal. The right or chance to express an opinion or participate in a decision:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

say-so

[ˈseɪsəʊ] N (= authority) on whose say-so?¿autorizado por quién?, ¿con permiso de quién?
it depends on his say-sotiene que darle el visto bueno
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

say-so

n (inf: = assertion) → Wort nt; (= authority)Plazet nt; on whose say-so?wer sagt das? (inf), → mit welchem Recht?
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

say-so

[ˈseɪˌsəʊ] n (fam) (authority) to do sth on sb's say-sofare qc col permesso di qn
why should I believe it just on your say-so? → perché dovrei crederci, solo perché lo dici tu?
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995