sea power

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sea power

n.
1. A nation having significant naval strength.
2. Naval strength.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sea power

n
1. (Military) a nation that possesses great naval strength
2. (Military) the naval strength of a country or nation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sea′ pow`er


n.
1. naval strength.
2. a nation that possesses formidable naval power.
[1840–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sea power - naval strength
military capability, military posture, military strength, strength, posture - capability in terms of personnel and materiel that affect the capacity to fight a war; "we faced an army of great strength"; "politicians have neglected our military posture"
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
2.sea power - a nation that possesses formidable naval strength
body politic, country, nation, res publica, commonwealth, state, land - a politically organized body of people under a single government; "the state has elected a new president"; "African nations"; "students who had come to the nation's capitol"; "the country's largest manufacturer"; "an industrialized land"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Although with the destruction of the Invincible Armada the sea power of Spain had been crippled, it had not been utterly broken, and still whenever Spanish and English ships met on the seas, there was sure to be battle.
''Warships of Non-Black Sea powers may not remain in the Black Sea longer than 21 days, the Montreux Convention reads.
Mackinder's 1904 article "The Geographical Pivot of History," his 1919 masterpiece Democratic Ideals and Reality, and his 1943 article "The Round World and the Winning of the Peace," identified the centrality of Eurasia to world politics and analyzed the enduring competition between sea powers and land powers in the global geographical setting.
Alfred Thayer Mahan wrote prolifically in the late 19th-early 20th century about the importance of sea power in history and its geopolitical implications for the global balance of power.
Moreover the world island's "Heartland"--at its maximum extent including Russia, Mongolia, Iran, Tibet, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe--had the great advantage of virtual inaccessibility to sea power. Historically, it was not so unusual for land powers to defeat and overcome sea powers.
What distinguished Rimland nations was their amphibious nature: they were neither purely land powers nor sea powers. But taken together, it was these Rimland powers--and not Mackinder's Heartland--that contained most of the human population and economic productivity on the planet.
This charming little book explains how sailing was done before the compass (by the stars and wind directions), the history of what we mean by "direction," star charts, wind charts, and much nautical lore, adding a measure of awe to how Venetians and Triestini became sea powers at all.
The point that land and sea powers tend to exhibit different types of foreign policies may not be new, but Liska offers interesting extensions of traditional geopolitical analyses.
As the strategies of the sea powers still testify, there is always advantage to be had from a "decided preponderance at sea."
Technology gave sea powers an advantage during what Mackinder called the "Columbian epoch," but that was changing at the dawn of the 20th century.
Alfred Thayer Mahan (1840-1914) was an American naval officer who became the most influential historian and proponent of sea power. Mahan's The Influence of Sea Power upon History (1890), his two-volume The Influence of Sea Power upon the French Revolution and Empire (1892), and his two-volume Life of Nelson (1897) gloried in Britain's use of sea power to defeat potential European continental hegemons.
Relations is a comparative study of the quest for sea power by nations that are considered "maritime power states" and "continental power states" and it is an attempt to apply related lessons to an understanding of current Sino-U.S.