seedeater

(redirected from seedeaters)

seed·eat·er

 (sēd′ē′tər)
n.
A bird that feeds primarily on seeds, especially any of various South and Central American songbirds of the genus Sporophila.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

seedeater

(ˈsiːdˌiːtə)
n
(Animals) any bird feeding mainly on seeds
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Surface mulches deprive weed seeds of light and increase their natural predation by providing habitat for crickets, ground beetles, and other seedeaters. The cool, moist conditions under mulch will also cause many weed seeds to rot, so mulches that give good surface coverage can both prevent and cure seemingly overwhelming weed issues.
They flew more like short-billed falcons than peaceful seedeaters.
Among the eleven feeding guilds represented by bird species in Musanze city, seedeaters were the most common in both built-up areas and open fields, followed by insectivorous species and scavengers (Figure 8).
Although seedeaters, especially the Grey-headed Sparrow (Passer griseus), dominated almost all microlandscapes, it is important to consider that in wastelands scavengers were the most abundant (Figure 13).
Discovery of a second population of white-collared seedeaters, Sporophila torqueola (Passeriformes: Emberizidae) along the Rio Grande of Texas.
Rufous-capped warbler and white-collared seedeater from Webb County, Texas.
Deer and white-footed mice are mostly seedeaters. They're more likely to stash acorns, the scales of pine and spruce cones, and beech nuts between wall studs.
Many of the finches are also softbills to distinguish them from the seedeaters. Softbills require different diets and generally do not eat seeds, but feed mainly on insects and a variety of fruits.
The breakdown of mutualisms can lead to parasitism or even the complete dissolution of the symbiosis." Several species of yucca moth, for example, have evolved from pollinators of the yucca plant to non-pollinating seedeaters. And some plants have changed from being mutualistic traders of sugars for minerals with their fungal symbionts to energy-sucking parasites that draw both resources from fungal-plant networks.
White-collared seedeaters were studied at two sites in Zapata County, Texas.
The largest foraging group of seedeaters observed consisted of approximately 10 birds feeding on barnyardgrass and Louisiana cupgrass at Site 1.
Seedeaters such as evening grosbeaks, goldfinches, and pine siskins prefer black oil sunflower and niger thistle.