seemly

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Related to seemliest: debilitating, suavest, blasé

seem·ly

 (sēm′lē)
adj. seem·li·er, seem·li·est
1. Conforming to standards of conduct and good taste; suitable: seemly behavior.
2. Of pleasing appearance; handsome.
adv.
In a seemly manner; suitably.

[Middle English semely, from Old Norse sœmiligr, from sœmr, fitting; see sem- in Indo-European roots.]

seem′li·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

seemly

(ˈsiːmlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
1. proper or fitting
2. obsolete pleasing or handsome in appearance
adv
archaic properly or decorously
[C13: from Old Norse sœomiligr, from sœmr befitting]
ˈseemliness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

seem•ly

(ˈsim li)

adj. -li•er, -li•est,
adv. adj.
1. fitting or proper; decorous: Your outburst was hardly seemly.
2. suitable or appropriate: a seemly gesture.
3. of pleasing appearance; handsome.
adv.
4. in a seemly manner; fittingly; becomingly.
[1175–1225; Middle English semely < Old Norse sæmiligr honorable]
seem′li•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.seemly - according with custom or propriety; "her becoming modesty"; "comely behavior"; "it is not comme il faut for a gentleman to be constantly asking for money"; "a decent burial"; "seemly behavior"
proper - marked by suitability or rightness or appropriateness; "proper medical treatment"; "proper manners"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

seemly

Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

seemly

adjective
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
لائِق، مُناسِب
slušný
sømmelig
illendõ
viîeigandi, sæmandi
edebe uygunnazik

seemly

[ˈsiːmlɪ] ADJ (seemlier (compar) (seemliest (superl))) (frm) [behaviour, language, dress] → decoroso, decente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

seemly

[ˈsiːmli] (old-fashioned) adjconvenable
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

seemly

adj (+er)schicklich; it isn’t seemly (for somebody to do something)es schickt sich nicht (für jdn, etw zu tun)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

seemly

[ˈsiːmlɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (frm) (behaviour, language, dress) → decoroso/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

seem

(siːm) verb
to have the appearance or give the impression of being or doing. A thin person always seems (to be) taller than he really is; She seems kind; He seemed to hesitate for a minute.
ˈseeming adjective
existing in appearance, though not usually in reality. her seeming indifference.
ˈseemingly adverb
apparently; according to report. Seemingly, her mother is very ill.
ˈseemly adjective
(negative unseemly) (of behaviour etc) suitable, proper or decent. seemly conduct.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
The Wife, where danger or dishonour lurks, Safest and seemliest by her Husband staies, Who guards her, or with her the worst endures.
"The more pompous talk about freedom of speech and 'the public's right to know'; the least talented talk about Art; the seemliest murmur about earning a living." The religion writer often goes a step further, daring to suggest that the act of worming one's way into people's most hidden-away spaces--their faith, their gods, their inner lives--is warranted, because telling the stories of other people's beliefs and practices will somehow increase cross-cultural understanding, possibly heal old wounds suffered in the never-ending clash of civilizations, and generally make the world a better place.