strangelet


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Related to strangelet: Vacuum energy, quark star, Neutronium

strange·let

 (strānj′lĭt)
n.
A hypothetical particle or small body of strange matter that may be as large or larger than an atomic nucleus but smaller than a neutron star.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
No particle accelerator has yet produced a glimpse of a strangelet, and scientists haven't yet found any strange matter on the surfaces of neutron stars, where it should be if the theory holds up.
Such chunks are termed strangelets, and there is that worrisome notion suggesting that, if a strangelet bumps into an agglomeration of ordinary matter (the stuff of stars, planets, moons, and ourselves), it could change the ordinary matter into strange matter.
Still other scientists fear events in the collider could create "a theoretical particle called a strangelet that would turn the planet to goo." That's a quote, folks: "turn the planet to goo." Now, don't you feel so much better?
Oddly by Joyce Dunbar and Patrick Benson, (Walker Books, pounds 11.99) Naked Mole Rat Gets Dressed by Mo Willems ((Walker Books, pounds 5.99) A VERY strange tale of three unusual creatures - Lostlet, Strangelet and Oddlet - who meet
Prior to the launch, the internet was abuzz with rumours that the particle accelerator could create black holes or an as-yet hypothetical particle called a strangelet that would grow and destroy the earth.
Enigmatic phenomena called dark matter and dark energy account for the rest.Before the startup, internet-driven rumours said the LHC would create black holes or a nasty hypothetical particle called a strangelet that would gobble up the planet.CERN commissioned a panel to verify its safety calculations and France also carried out its own assessment.
Even before the Big Bang reprise conducted by the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) came to fruition in Switzerland, several people had predicted that the experiment would create black holes or a hypothetical particle called a strangelet that would destroy the planet.
Wagner and Sancho claimed the giant accelerator could spit out something called a Strangelet which could convert our planet to a lump of dense, shrunken "strange matter".
There's a minuscule possibility that the accelerator could create a "strangelet"--a form of matter that, in the words of the British astronomer Sir Martin Rees, "could transform the entire planet Earth into an inert hyperdense sphere about 100 meters across." The risk won't become remotely significant until an accelerator has been in operation for centuries, so it's commonly dismissed as unworthy of consideration.
If a strangelet fell onto a neutron star, the conversion of the whole star might take less than a day, says Norman K.
Former nuclear safety officer Walter Wagner and botanist Luis Sancho claim in a lawsuit filedin Hawaii the giant accelerator could spit out something called a Strangelet which could convert our planet to a lump of dense, shrunken "strange matter".