strangles


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Related to strangles: Puppy Strangles

stran·gles

 (străng′gəlz)
pl.n. (used with a sing. verb)
An infectious disease of horses and related animals, caused by the bacterium Streptococcus equi and characterized by inflammation of the nasal mucous membrane and abscesses under the jaw and around the throat that cause a strangling or choking sensation.

[From Middle English strangle, strangulation, from stranglen, to strangle; see strangle.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

strangles

(ˈstræŋɡəlz)
n
(Veterinary Science) (functioning as singular) an acute bacterial disease of horses caused by infection with Streptococcus equi, characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes of the respiratory tract, resulting in abscesses and a nasal discharge. Also called: equine distemper
[C18: from strangle]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

dis•tem•per1

(dɪsˈtɛm pər)

n.
1.
a. Also called canine distemper. an infectious disease chiefly of young dogs, caused by an unidentified virus and characterized by lethargy, fever, catarrh, photophobia, and vomiting.
b. Also called strangles. an infectious disease of horses, caused by the bacillus Streptococcus equi and characterized by catarrh of the upper air passages and the formation of pus in the submaxillary and other lymphatic glands.
c. Also called feline distemper. a usu. fatal viral disease of cats, characterized by fever, vomiting, and diarrhea, leading to severe dehydration.
2. a deranged condition of mind or body; a disorder or disease: a feverish distemper.
3. disorder or disturbance, esp. of a political nature.
v.t.
4. Obs. to derange physically or mentally.
[1300–50; Middle English (< Middle French destemprer) < Medieval Latin distemperāre= Latin dis- dis-1 + temperāre to temper]

dis•tem•per2

(dɪsˈtɛm pər)

n.
1. a technique of decorative painting in which glue or gum is used as a binder or medium to achieve a mat surface and rapid drying.
2. a painting executed by this method.
v.t.
3. to paint in distemper.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French distemprer) < Medieval Latin distemperāre to dissolve, dilute]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.strangles - an acute bacterial disease of horses characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes
distemper - any of various infectious viral diseases of animals
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
He continued to wail and to strangle with more salt water.
Spy," cried the duke, more and more enraged, "I will strangle you with my own hands."
I threw myself on the bed and turned my nose to the wall, that I mightn't break my promise and strangle Grimaud."
La Ramee, some day when he sends for you, you must let me put on your clothes; I will go in your stead; I will strangle him, and upon my honor, if that is made a condition I will return to prison."
And some when they are old; Some strangle with the hands of Lust,
The stock off 20c to $25.20 and one player buys 7.5K Feb 25 puts for $1.35 along with 10.6K Feb 28 calls for 55c, while selling 7.6K Jun 24 - 27 strangles at $3.76.
is strangles? QWhat A Strangles is one of the most common equine diseases in horses in Britain.
Dubai: The Emirates Racing Authority (ERA) on Wednesday played down fears that a case of the potentially deadly equine disease strangles found in the UK originated in the UAE.
A total of 194 nasal swabs and 56 pus samples were collected and examined from horses clinically diagnosed for strangles; 113 (45.2%) were found positive for S.
FEARS that strangles could have surfaced in Lambourn have been dispelled after an unnamed horse with Sylvester Kirk tested negative for the highly infectious disease, writes Graham Green.
Jane Evans, 51, of Rhuddlan, said she was treated "like a leper" when her 16-year-old gelding Herbie was diagnosed with the feared respiratory sickness strangles.