subordinate clause

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subordinate clause

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

subordinate clause

n
(Grammar) grammar a clause with an adjectival, adverbial, or nominal function, rather than one that functions as a separate sentence in its own right. Compare coordinate clause, main clause
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

subor′dinate clause′


n.
a clause that modifies the principal clause or some part of it or that serves a noun function in the principal clause, as when she arrived in the sentence I was there when she arrived or that she has arrived in the sentence I doubt that she has arrived. Compare main clause.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subordinate clause - a clause in a complex sentence that cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and that functions within the sentence as a noun or adjective or adverb
complex sentence - a sentence composed of at least one main clause and one subordinate clause
clause - (grammar) an expression including a subject and predicate but not constituting a complete sentence
restrictive clause - a subordinate clause that limits or restricts the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
descriptive clause, nonrestrictive clause - a subordinate clause that does not limit or restrict the meaning of the noun phrase it modifies
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
podřadné souvětí
bisætning
sivulause
alárendelt mellékmondatalárendelt mondat
aukasetning
bijzin
podraďovacia veta
yan cümlecik

subordinate clause

n (Gram) → Nebensatz m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

subordinate

(səˈboːdinət) adjective
lower in rank, power, importance etc. A colonel is subordinate to a brigadier.
noun
a person who is subordinate. to give orders to one's subordinates.
subordinate clause
a clause introduced in a sentence by a conjunction etc, and acting as a noun, adjective or adverb. I don't know who she is; The book that's on the table is mine; She's crying because you were unkind.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Incidentally, as per the folk tradition of Poland and other Slavic countries, the Easter eggs are also a widely popular symbol of new life and quite similar to the tradition in most other countries, the Easter baskets are given as gifts and even though the Easter Bunny doesn't actually deliver the baskets ala Santa and his subordinate clauses, the adults and children alike all love receiving them - so please do remember to give me the Faberge eggs!
It describes the cultural and historical context; phonology; the morphology of nouns, adjectives, and pronouns; the noun phrase; verbs; grammatical relations and transitivity; tense, aspect, and person in finite verbs; mood and modality; questions; negation; adverbial words; subordinate clauses; clause chaining and clause combining; nominalization; relative clauses; speech reports and complement clauses; and discourse organization.
Not only will vocabulary be corrected, but G Suite will also make sure that verb tenses, prepositional phrases, and subordinate clauses are executed correctly.
In sentence (2) above, the complex sentence, for instance, has one finite independent clause which is the entire sentence and two subordinate clauses (...
Now, the company has new 'grammar suggestions', which are said to "catch things like spelling and grammatical errors that inadvertently change the meaning of a sentence." As one would guess, the feature is based on a subset of AI and uses "machine translation-based approach to recognize errors and suggest corrections." Explaining the feature, Google says, "Our AI can catch several different types of corrections, from simple grammatical rules like how to use articles in a sentence (like "a" versus "an"), to more complicated grammatical concepts such as how to use subordinate clauses correctly.
The presumption of two independent wh-chains would similarly explain why the Estonian pronoun mis may surface in different case forms in the matrix and subordinate clauses, as in (11b), (12a) and (12b).
9-16 Could do better You may be in the middle set, but noun phrases, modal verbs, possessive pronouns and subordinate clauses clearly still get your head in a spin.
No explanation is given for why Isabella's former fiance, Hugh de Lusignan, should have reacted so violently to the marriage, and John's formal trial in Philip Augustus's court is buried in a couple of subordinate clauses. At most of the moments in his reign when many have found John cowardly or fatally lethargic, Church finds logistical or strategic explanations for what he did or did not do.
On the subject of Boccaccio's long sentences formed by lines of subordinate clauses, the translator states, "I have sometimes been forced to break them up in order to ensure that they are readable in English" (p.
Many paragraphs are densely packed with acronyms, names, and dates, and at times sentences generate seemingly endless collections of subordinate clauses. References to the noted chant scholar Peter Wagner, and various figures in French musical life (e.g., Vincent d'Indy), are introduced without any mention of their larger significance to the topic at hand.
Four morphological developments in EQ and can easily be shown to represent deviations from Quechuan patterns and were identified in Muysken (2009) as innovations of this particular northern variety: some reduction in person and number marking, the form and function of an erstwhile benefactive applicative, and the make-up of (de-)verbal forms used in selected kinds of subordinate clauses. (3) (I will very briefly address selected tense-aspect-modality-evidentiality (TAME) markers at the end of this section.) The deviations are schematically summarized in Table 1 below and discussed in turn in what follows.
They may erect a Grotto for Santa Claus (and his subordinate clauses) as they prepare to welcome their biggest congregation to the Annual Sale.