subordinationism


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Related to subordinationism: tritheism, Adoptionism, Modalism

subordinationism

(səˌbɔːdɪˈneɪʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Theology) either of two interpretations of the doctrine of the Trinity, often regarded as heretical, according to which the Son is subordinate to the Father or the Holy Ghost is subordinate to both
subˌordiˈnationist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

subordinationism

the theological tenet of progressively declining essence within the Trinity. — subordinationist, n.
See also: Christianity
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References in periodicals archive ?
This risks subordinationism given Zizioulas's concept of the Godhead.
Filled with "nature's gifts" and led by grace, Southwell's Christ Child is obedient to the Father's will without the taint of subordinationism that will enter into Milton's "Paradise Regained" in the next century.
Subordinationism, Arianism, which caused the murder of millions, Macedonianism, Nestorianism, Monophysitism, Monothelitism, Donatism, Pelagianism--all these in the first five hundred years of the Church.
(92) Nevertheless, Johnson uses tentative language when spelling out the four charges: Dupuis "may solve the problem of subordinationism," but does so "by undermining the unity of two natures in one person." "The way Dupuis distinguishes kingdom and church seems to require a second parallel economy"; he "implicitly posits two economies." The trinitarian Christology of Dupuis "may implicitly undermine the unity of the divine and human natures of Jesus Christ." This language of "may," "seems," and "implicitly" reaches its highpoint with the claim that Dupuis "implicitly severs the unity of the economic and the immanent Trinity." (93)
Abstract: The theology of divine processions developed by Gregory of Nyssa in the last decades of the fourth century was essential for the definitive statement of pneumatological dogma and for the overcoming of Trinitarian subordinationism. Following the path of Athanasius, Basil and Gregory of Nazianzus, Gregory of Nyssa explores the personal properties of the Holy Spirit, describing its origin in the Father "through" the Son.
She also traces the (heretical) subordinationism that Lewis as a young Christian found in the Trinity--heretical because it is clearly denied by two of the Creeds that Lewis accepted.
This is, however, "soteriological subordinationism": While in no way diminishing the work of the Son, the Spirit's work cannot only be considered "subjective," in other words, secondary in the accomplishment of salvation.
(172.) See KEVIN GILES, THE TRINITY & SUBORDINATIONISM: THE DOCTRINE OF GOD & THE CONTEMPORARY GENDER DEBATE 7-8, 79, 167 (2002).
Hampton devotes the major part of his study to a detailed analysis of three controversies: the Reformed responses to George Bull's Arminian Harmonia Apostolica (1670), to William Sherlock's A Vindication of the Doctrine of the Trinity (1690), and to Samuel Clark's The Scripture Doctrine of the Trinity (1712), which led to the so-called Arian controversy, an anti-Trinitarian move that Hampton argues should more properly be termed subordinationism. Underlying these controversies was a different understanding of the attributes and nature of God, an understanding set out at length in Archbishop Tillotson's sermons, published in a series of volumes posthumously between 1694 and 1704.
Walter Shurden concluded that "the subordinationism of clergy to congregation in Mullins's thought is impossible to dispute." See Shurden, "The Priesthood of All Believers," 36-37.
"My argument concerning the Son's status as a divine person is not situated in the context of ongoing commentary on Milton's orthodox trinitarianism, Arianism, or subordinationism" (274, n.2).